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Full text of "The annual"

b^-" I lillB^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



3 1833 03389 5233 

Gc 977. 102 D33st 1921 
Steele High School (Dayton 
Ohio) ' 

The annual 



^%^:^'M^'^^ 



D. 



PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 




EX LIBRIS 




Foreword 

'Gathering as We stray, a sense 
Of life so lovely and intense 
It lingers as We Wander hence. 



Aflen County Puttie Ubrary 
900 Webster Street 
PC Box 2270 
FortWayne, IN 46801-2270 



To Steele 

Dear, roiigh, gray walls. 

Towering toward the sky, 
How many treasured niemories 

Within thy compass lie. 

How many are the hearts whose love 

Is loyally thine own. 
Who know "twas first in Steele for them 

The light of Wisdom shone. 

How many otterings are laid 

In tribute on thy shrine; 
How many songs have risen to tell 

The glory whieh is thine. 

Oh Steele, fair school, we also love 

And honor thy proud name. 
Ouj- offerings we ad<l to those 

Before thine altar flame. 

Pauline Schroy, '21. 



Page Six 



IVe Dedicate Our Annual 

To the memory 

of 

Miss Margaret Hollahan 

Our Beloved Teacher^ 

Who by her sympathy and wisdom, 

Her patience and never-failing kindness, 

Will ever be an inspiration 

To the Class of '21 . 



The Personality of Steele 

J. H. Paixtek 

"Has your seliool a persouality?" This is one of the questions 
of each principal by the committee of teachers who made the recent survey 
of our schools. 

The character of a school, like the character of an individual, is a 
matter of development, growth, and environment. The elements Avhich 
unite to produce tliis individuality arc subtle and complex. They embody 
the best traditions of her best teachers and students. The worthy tradi- 
tions are more enduring because our teachers and the most of our students 
are honestly striving to reach higher mental and moral heights, and 
instinctively assimilate the good and eliminate the bad. 

The personality of Steele has thus, through many years, been built 
up toward the highest ideals by the devoted care of her teachers and 
pupils. Their personality has been l)uilt into the Steele spirit just as 
the carefully chiseled stones have been built into the beautiful walls of 
the Steele building. The lives and examples of many teachers who have 
worked with us and gone on to greater opportunities, or who have gone 
to claim their final reward, are still a living, potent influence in our 
school. The teachers who are now with us will continue to render service 
long after they have ceased to serve in person. Our students, too, both 
present and past, have merged their personality into this great composite 
character of Steele. 

Wliast then is the character of this couiposite Steele? 

The i-eady response of her sons to the call of their country, the self- 
sacrificing service of her daughters, the part she has taken in humani- 
tarian movements, prove her civic interest and patriotic loyalty. The 
students' participation in the management of study halls, class rooms, 
plays, assemblies and other school activities shows a democratic spirit. 
The free, yet orderly, j>assing of classes, mingling in the lunch room and 
corridors, and the quiet attention during assemblies, indicate a large 
measiire of self-control. The cordial relations existing between students 
and teachers show a mutual faith and a spirit of cooperation and fair 
play. The lives of our former students, their success in college and in 
business, the places of honor and responsibility which they hold in this 
community, indicate a foundation of efficient education, of culture, and 
of character. 

Such is the Steele personality: an amalgamation of loyalty, 
democracy, self-control, culture, and character; a willingness to toil, to 
suffer, and to efface oneself for the greater glory of the alma mater. 

Page Ten 




MARY ALICE HUNTER 
Farulty Censor 



HELEN R. BURNS 
Faculty Censor 



ROBERT ZBHRING, '21 

Editor-in-Chief 



JAMES FUNKHOUSER, '21 
Associate Editor 



ELIZABETH FOLGER, '21 

Contrihuting Editress 



PAULINE SCHROY, '2 
Society Editress 



FLORENCE MAYER, '21 
Exchange Editress 



VIOLET EVANS, '21 



CHARLES SMITH, '21 



CHARLES BREISH, '21 
Circulation Manager 

The Staff 







Page Twelve 






HERMAN OLT, '21 
Bimine.ss Manayer 



ROBERT McCONNAUGHEY, '21 
Athletic Editor 



JOHN BLOCHER, '21 
'iiior Assistant Business Managr, 



LOUISE KRAMER, '21 
Athletic Editress 



SAM LEBENSBERGER, '22 
tior Assistant Business Manager 




HELEN QUARTEL, 
Alumni Editress 



ROBERT YOUNG, '23 

T Assistant Business Manager 




VERL PERRINE, '22 
Assistant Local Editor 



JOHN VANCE, '22 
Assistant Circulation Manager 

MAUD HARRIS, '23 
Assistant Local Editress 

The Staff 




Page Thirteen 



CHAS. H. APPLE MRS. AGNES O. BECK 

Pepartment of Chemistry Department of History 




1. H. PALMER 



ROLAND BEVAN 



J. C. BOLDT 



:arrie a. breene 



FRANCES BROW> 



The Faculty 




Page Fourteen 







S. AUGUSTA P. DICKSON 
department of English 



GEORGIA A. DONLEY 



MARIE 


DURST 


Department 


„/ French 


GEORGE R. 


EASTMAN 


Peparlmen. 


r ,./ I.nlin 



AUGUST F. FOERSTE 
Department of Physics 



The Faculty 







Huge Fifteen 




\S. L. MATTIS I J MtllLtH 

Department of History fieportmetil of Physical Training 

Page Sixteen 




H. W. MUS 
D^pnnment of M 



E. C. PI Ml'HH 




E. J. ROBINSON 

Imenl oj Manual Training 



ADA ROSENTII;! 





J. D. RUNKEE 
Commercial Departm 



J. SCHANTZ 





H. SEIGEER 
enl of Malhema 



F. C. STANTON 
meat of Manual Training 







:e h. sn\ KRS 



Page Seventeen 




ciAJcrty 



Class Officers 



President 
Robert McCoxxavgh 



ISecretary 
JrsTix CoMPTo: 




'AII.INE DOIGHTY 

Vice-Presitle7it 



RrssEL Brvxdige 
.S'e rf/eo n t-a t-Arm s 



Committee on Committees 



Rur.KKT ZKiiiUMi. Chdirman 
James Fi-.xkiioi.ser Robert K.nee 

Josephine Hastings Gwexdolyx Weeks 




Page Twenty-One 



iifiBfiiiiii^iiiiTrii 



Senior Class History 



IN the antiiiMii of 1!»1S, we tMiteivd Steele (jiilte new to the plaee hut 
full of vio-or and enthusiasm. What ai'dor and spirit characterized 
us from the startl At tirst wv wore rather awed by the smilinoly 
superior Seniors and Juniors, but we soon learned the rules and regu- 
lations of the school and felt (luite as much at home as the upperclass- 
men. As Sophomores we took more interest in the school activities 
than is usually the case with people of that rank. Our class was well 
represented on the boys' athletic teams, while our Sophomore girls kept 
the Senior and Junior teams busy. Our work in the class rooms was 
very satisfactory. We came into the school determined to Avin out in 
scholarship and we did. We are proud of our part in Steele's twenty-fifth 
anniversary celebration. We contributed a pageant, gymnasium and 
exhibition work, a play, regular class work, and many written folios for 
exhibition. 

As Juniors, we lost not one bit of our splendid class spirit. We 
organized rather late in the year, choosing a very competent staff of 
officers. Robert Zehring was our Junior president. We were the first 
class in Steele to give the Sophomores a "^Velcoming Party." Our 
"Junior Carnival" was a huge success. What fun we had there I The 
crowning event of the year was our Farewell to the Seniors. This was 
held at Memorial Hall and everyone agreed it was "just perfect." But, 
like all ambitious Juniors, we desired to reach tlie highest pinnacle in a 
high school career. Oh, to be a Senior ! 

The class of 1921 has now almost completed the last lap. Under 
the leadership of Kobert McConnaughey, our Senior president, and his 
fine staff of officers, we feel that we have accomplished much and that we 
may be justly proud of our entire career at Steele, but chiefly are we 
proud of our Senior year. Everyone is convinced that our play was the 
finest Senior play ever presented. Through our three years at Steele our 
members have been called to various positions of responsibility. Athletic 
teams, debate teams, staff work, and all other school activities demanded 
our assistance and neA'er have we shirked responsibility. We have tried 
to give our best to Steele. We love her dearly, and wlier'er we are we shall 
look back to these few years of work for her a>s the happiest yeai*s in our 
life. And as we advance into other paths of life, it is our fervent hope 
that we may live up to her high ideals in everything we do. 

May Steele flourish and prosper in the future as she has in the past, 
is the dearest wish of the class of 1921. 

Elizabeth Foloer. '21. 

Page Txventy-Three 



The Senior Play 



IT was only after some delilieratiou that the Senior Class deeidert to 
jikkIiuc "The Irresistible ^laniiaduke," a three-act comedy of Enj^lish 
Society life. Tliis jjlay written by Ernest Denny, liad been i)rodnced 
bnt one otlier time in America, and had never been attcMiipted except by 
professionals. It was rather a nniipie nndei-takiny for lii^ii school ]Mii)i]s. 
Tlie entlnisiasm of tlie audience pronounced the ]ii-(>duclion a decided 
success. 

Ilohcrl Knee was indeed irn sistiblc as the "in-esistibh- .Marniiulukc."" 
Ills character iiortrayal was e(|ual (o thai of a pinlessional. Creat 
versatility was disjihiyed liy the ease with whicli he clianfied from the 
fine yonns' man, wlio believed himself a lord, into tlie real ilarmadnke 
— a liopeless protliji'ate. 

Pauline Cnrtner, as the little Irish liirl. was a vci-y chai-mini; leadini; 
lady. Her inter]iretation of the jiart was apiiealin^ly natural. 

The ride of Lady Altliea, .Maruiaduke's aristocratic u:other, was no 
easy one. It was very ably taken, liowever, by I>oi-othy (Miauiberlain. 
The dignified precision of her siicech and manner was all that could be 
desired. The wonder was that she could be so calm witli sucli a person 
as ilortimer Grejiory for a husband. Hasil Leever, as Mortimer (Jrejjfory, 
was the very opposite of liis wife. Lady Althea. He was either shontinj;- 
demands as lie ruslu'd about or ijlarinii on the world as he aniirily cliewed 
iiisci-ar. 

(Jwendolyn ^Veeks as Miss ^^■ylie. ^lortimer's secretary, was very 
wily in niana.iiinji tlie "Irresistible .Maruiaduke." 

Lady Susan, Lady Altliea's sister, was cleverly iiersonitied l)y Helen 
Quart(d. 

It would have been imiiossible to recoiiuize in the ])ryinii- housemaid, 
Dawson, any reseud)lance to Kuth .Mcl'herscm. The e.xact way she had 

ment. 

Ray Welsh looked and acted tlie ]y,\vt of tlie genial Dr. O'Keefe. His 
delightful accent i)layed no small jiart in the success of his representation. 

Knssel Hrundige, tlu- clumsy tradesuian, introduced some clever 
sidei)lay. 

(Itlier characters iuiportant in unraveling the plot were dames, the 
chautVeur, j.layed liy Kenneth Keucli ; Christopher Deacon, a solicitor, 
played by Everett Layman; and Shelliy Hnrghei' as Waller. .Marmaduke's 
valet. 

The su<-c(ss of the jday was due to the untiring etfoits of the very 
able director, ^liss Crace Stivers, and the earnest work of this siilenilid 
cast. The ])lay has added another real achievement to the list of things 
accomplished by the class of "21. 

Violet Ev.vxs. '21 

Page Twenty -Five 



CLASS SONG 

1921 



Words and Music by 
SHELBY M. BURGHER 



Con Spirito 



Fail - rst school m all the land, Pirc ■ ictis to cut hearts al- 

Smi- ling fac - et ours have been, We the class o( tweif . ty 




way , Rich treas - ures ihou hatt giv'n. Man - y rules we will o. 
one; Steele's proud name we'll de - lend, Aslhiu life we jout - ney 




bey. Deal old col ■ ors Red and Black, We do now m tri ■ umph 

on. When we look on thy giay walls. And our leach- et» kind and 




^mpi^^^^ 



Page Twenty-Six 



Love for thee we ne'er will lack . We 

We re - grel to leave ihy halls , Bui we 




Ckci-rlg^ l^^m/fli 



Page Twenty-Seven 




JEANETTE BARNES 




PAULINE BAUER 



ROBERT BAUMHECKEL 



■Robin Govd/ellau 



EDWIN BEAVER 



To study is siu-h uselesn expenditure of energy. 







RUTH BEEKLEV 



He iiladly pronf Ruth possession of "o smooth 



tdfast mind, pentle thought: 



ELLA BEELER 




lARRY BERKDOLL 



H'hen Harry says anything in that quiet, authorit 



LOUISE BICKHAM 



"Her cheerful nords have brightened many 




JOHN BLOCHER 



Hi Y. Slair, •21. 

I of his unfailing good 



OTTO BOECK 



that brought Steele 



Page Tiveiity-Eiglu 



ELIZABETH BOHN 



ROBERT BOZARTH 

Goad luclc e" "''ll> ''"■« 



SAUL BBASLEY 



CHARLES BREISH 





Circulation Managei 
netiierf. "SleeUle" whose greale 



MARJORIE BREWSTER 
Lunsfellow. Aurean. Clee 

Good nature is the product of right 

FREIDA BRITTINGHAM 
Maysville High. 
/ believe in oldfashioned common 



WALTER BRl BAKER 

Tippi-canoe High. GaveL 

ff alter for the latest thing in men's habert 

RUSSEL BRUNDICE 

South Bend High. 

I'hilo. Social Science. Senior Play 



EDITH BRYANT 

Garfield. Richmond. I 

'hen Edith smiles, uords are 



FREIDA BUNDENTHAL 
Longfellow. EHen H. Richa 






PAUL BVNCER 



lile and alicays smiling 



SHELBY BIRGHER 
Clay City, Ky. Forum. McDowell. Senior Play. 



orchestra in himself: he plays alw 



Page Twenty -Nine 




LYSLE BUTLER 

Ccnlral. 

I. Hi Y. Varsily S. FoolbaU. '21. 

Auditorium Debate. Basketball, '21. 

If'ith him basketball is a serious business. 

BERNICE BUYER 

iiville High. Cleveland. MacDo»ell. 

Y. W. C. A. Club. 



FLOYD CAMERON 





CATHERINE CAROLAND 



PAULINE CHANEY 

Patterson. 
Y. W. C. A. Club. Orche! 



SID-NEY CLARK 



CAROL COCKRELL 
MadiRon. Ind. 
>dest maid, full of gentle dignity. 

ELIZABETH COCKRELL 



JUSTIN COMPTON 

Longfellow. 

Criterion. Secretary Senior Class. 

Auditorium Debate. 

IT/iy so solemn':' The world was made for soi 

ELIZABETH COOMLER 

Huffman. Agora. Clionian. 

The personification of "jest and youthful jollit 





DOROTHY CREW 



her manners, alt 



JEANNETTE CREW 
Longfellow. Eccritean. 

(TouMn-I Jeannelle make a perfect Quakei 

MARION CUNNINGHAM 

Sacred Hearl. 

ff ilh the emphasis on the cunning. 



EVA CURLE 



BURR CURNUTTE 



ETHEL CURRAN 

Oswego. N. Y. 
A uarm-hearted maiden 



PAULINE CURTNER 
Hawthorne. 
Neotrophean. Senior Play. 



Footlii:hts are he 



KEITH CUSTIS 



HARRISON DANIELS 
Cenlral. 
son is ifont to speak to the point, especially 
in physics. 

SARAH DAVIDSON 
Range. Montana. Ellen H. Riehards. 

\im high and you tcilt accomplish much. 

MARGARET DAVIS 



I'tiSP ThirlY-One 




MILDRED DEADY 

any fun to be had. let me I 
PAULINE DILLSWORTH 





PAULINE DOUGHTY 

Central. Spur. Sleele Service. 

Vice-President of Senior Class. 

mocracy! the keynote of her character. 





whatsoever ; 



LESTER ELLISON- 




JOSEPH ENSLEY 
vp. Forum. Geographical 

sibte and uell bred man. 



CONSTANCE ERBAU( 

Perr} Twp. 
a maiden, $ood leithoi 



VIOLET EVANS 

.McKinley. 

Spur. Sleele Service. V. W. C. A. Club. 

Com. on Committees. Staff -21. Basketball. '20. 

t'iolet is as demure as her name — but tchen studies and 

senice tcork in the school are considered — she is a star. 



ELIZABETH FOLGER 

Vice-President of Junior Clas; 
Service Y. «. C. A. Club Staff. '21. 
Board of Directors. 
jcccmplishes much in her quiet icay. 





Page Thirty-Tuo 



ROBERT FOOSE 



RITH FORD 

r/in five me of mltire e" 



BOSALYN FBANK 
cKinley. Neolropliean. 




GLADYS FBYAR 



JAMES FUNKHOUSER 

Lonpfellow. Philomathean. Social S<-iencf 

acDouell. Secretary of Class. '20 Orche 

"A varray parfait gentle knight." 
CLYDE GEHRING 




Football. -11. -20. Baseball. '20. 



HELEN GIBSON 



B 



LUCILE GIBSON 
dame and gaily sing. 





Contrary to her name. Echo 



WALTER CLASER 
II his own mind and sliU 



DOROTHY GOETZ 



MARGARET HAAS 
Lincoln. Spur. 

and a cheery uord for all, is Margaret 



11 




Page Thirly-Tliree 




CATHERINE HADELER 
Oakwood. Spur. 

Serenity personified; calm, peace, and 
IU,h. 

THELMA HAC.NEY 



KATHRYN HALL 

for the history of Steele's Athletics, see Kathr' 

MARGARET HALTEMAN 
Van Clevf. 
Eccrilean. Steele Service. BasLelball. '2 

' been becoming to 




CLARA HART.MAN 



MARION HARVEY 



JOSEPHINE HASTINGS 
Hawthorne. 
Spur. Com, on Committees, 

A'o more pencils, no more boo 

EWELL HENDRICK 



RICHARD HENDRICK 



glasses to make himself look irise? 
JAMES HERMAN- 



CHARLES HILL 
iver. Geographical. 

tcithin my tips I rein. 



ROZELL HILL 

Our deeds determine us as much 




Page Thirty-Four 



ELDON HOERNER 



for learning uill i 



CHARLES HOEY 
,c Technical Research. Hi Y. 

will not be changed by place or lime 



ROSALIE HOHLER 



acDowelL V. W. C. 








VELMA HOLLOWAY 



ee Club. MacDowelL 



\o duty could oertake her; 




LINWOOD HOOVER 

Weaver. A?ora. Y. W. C. A. 

• most maidens, not only in that she 
but that she thinks before she speaks 



LOUIS INCELFINCER 
Hawthorne. Graphic Arts, 

lorf nature is the cure for all ills. 



KATHERINE JOHNSON 



THOMAS JOHNSON 



His posters hace done much to enliven the halls 



THELMA JOHNSTON 



others to be happy 



JEAN PAUL JONES 



HERBERT KAHN 



JACKSON KEEPER 




Pagp Thirty.Fit 




MILDRED KELBLE 
Van Clevr. Steele Service. 

Mildred is planning ro become Ihe uorl 

LOUISE KEMP 
CenlraL IS'eolrophean. 

he is not oppressed by the affairs of 





BasebalL 'IS. 'H. '20. '21. Track. '18. '19. 

BaskelbalL '19. '20. '21. 

His unerring toe has kicked many a victory for Steel 



JEANNETTE KNAPP 
Hawthorne. 
>r books lor fear of growing 



ROBERT KNEE 
Longfellow. 

'The glass of fashion and the mould of form," he bear 




MARY KNOX 



with us four years instead of 



GEORGE KOOCLER 




JOHN KRAMER 



LOUISE KRAMER 

Ruskin. 

Eccritean. MacDowell. Y. W. C. A. Club. 



NATHALIE LARSON 

Irving. Clionian. 

good comrade in alt thin 



Page Thirty-Six 




BASIL LEEVER 



FRANCES LEHMAN 

Ontral. Eccritean. 

Frankness and sincerity personifi 



JEKOME LEHMAN 

Edison. 

has found the art of being eloquently 

GRACE LEONARD 

Paltcrton. 

Most mfiidenly of alt maids was she 



NELLIE LIDDIL 

Nelrophean. Board of Dircclors. 

! a girl of high ideals and splendid scholarship. 

BARBARA LIGHT 



ALMA LINXWEILER 

Emrrson. 

Eccrilcan. Bafkelball. Y. W. C. A. Club. 

Coinmiltpe on Commiltees, '20. 

Alma is the kind of girl who makes even the rainiest a 

seem cheery. 

CHARLOTTE LONG 
Patlcrson. 
She is content to let others take the responsibility 






FRANKLIN McCANN 

tivers News. Board ol 
Audilorium Debalc. 



JANE McCANN 
Mrs. Link's, 
c Service. Y. W. C. A. Club. 




DOROTHY McCLARY 



MARJORIE McCLUER. 
Fairview. Eccrilean. 

'Modest doubt is called the beacon of 



Page Thirty-Seven 



1 

Q 



Page Thirty-Eight 



rid little knows the 



ROBERT McCON.NALGHEV 



ean. Social Science. Hi Y. Varsity "S." 
President Senior Class. '21. 



HELEN McFARLAND. 



LOUIS McLEAN 



Social Science. Hi Y. 

Flattery is the grei 



RUTH Mcpherson 



HAZEL MADDOX 



HELEN MARGOLIS 

Longfellow. 
Orie of our very pood studen 



DOROTHY MARK 



FLORENCE MAYER 



CYRUS MEAD 
John's School. Manlius, N. Y. 
has a iiholesome regard for tht 



The mildest 






EVA MILLER 



PRISCILLA MILLER 



RICHARD MOTE 



Gavel. Orche 




Hawlhornr. 



Social Scien 



seemed busier 





CATHERINE MOUNTSTEPHEN 

Oak^'ood. Agora. 

IOU5 mixture of work and play ma 



MARY MUNDAY 



A/nry is quiet, but a mighty good person to know. 




.lARY MUSSELMAN 



IRVIN NAAS 



CHARLOTTE MEDHAMER 



ft possible to ditigeni 




ISAHEL OCLESBEE 



nd soft of voice. 



HERMAN OLT 



GEORGE OWINCS 



Hole- peaeefuUy he steeps in physics class. 



Page Thirty-I\in^ 



DAVID PACE 



joh as il he had 



KATHRYN PAIL 

Van Clev-. Agora. 

efuses to be sad, though the ghosts of unprepa 



lONA PENCE 



e has made her aray through high school 
(helming odds. The best ttord to describe 



>ORMAN PETERSON 
Hughes High School. Cinrinnati 
Abililx is a poor man's Health. 



HERMINE POHLMAN 
Lincoln. Agora. 

If hen lovely maidens stoop to cajolery, pray 



WILLIAM PRATHER 

Emerson. 
Social Science. Technical Research. Hi Y. 



RICHARD PRICE 

■Willard. Foolball. '20. 

Indeed he hath a noble mind and the spirit of 





B 



RUTH PRIOR 
fellow. Eccrileai 

(e disposition. She i 



DAVID PRLCH 



HELEN QIARTEL 




Spur. MacDoxell. Sleele Serv 

Y. W. C. A. Club. Senior Play. 

Alumni Editress. '21. Baskelball. '20. 



RICHARD RAMSEYER 

Central. Lima. Ohio. 

Modesty clothes him like a garment. 

FRED REEL 

Central. Gavel. 

s learned the art of being eloquently 



B 
i 



Page Forty 




VIRGINIA REEL 



PALMER REIST 



KENNETH HENCH 



CLEO RETTER 
e. Technical Re 






HENRY REUTHER 
Lonpfellow. Technical Res 
s something else for a man t 



PEARL ROCKOFF 



DOROTHY ROEHM 



EDYTHE ROGERS 



ABRAHAM ROSENTHAL 



FANNY ROSENTHAL 
LongfelloK. 
nhean. Steele Service. 



Fanny's personaliti 




RUTH ROST 



NORMAN ROUTZOHN 



/ have said so, therefore I . 



Page Forty-One 



EARL RVPPERT 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. 
Technical Research. 
is of a pkilosophur mind. 



WALTER SAM)EL 
Van Cleve. Geographical. 
est physics question holds no terrors for hii 




HELEN SAPP 



EDITH SAUER 
Patterson. Spur, 

ability combined make h 



EVA SAUER 
iew. Clionian. 

r/ie best gift of mental 



PAIL SAYLER 

Brookville High. 

There is something other for a i> 



ELIZABETH SAYLOR 
Oak»ood. 
)<1 friend irho is leilUng to help 
difficulties, especially about less 





'AULINE SCHROY 



HELE.N SCOTT 
1 High. Greenfield, Ohio. 
(. pluck and eoodicill, are 
.« of Ufes clover." 



Page Forty-Tuo 




n 

Mad Kiver To»nship. ^HlX V^l 

Technical Research. Orche.lra. ^Mm-^ L^M 

Harry drill /.is saxophone ought to make good onyuhere. ^^Br '«^B 

MARTHA SHANK |||f M 

Willard. ■ I 

Ellen H. Richards. Baskelhall, '20. V I 

\i,„ that I have firtished lerpil. I can be happy. W ^^^ I 




DOROTHY SHANOR 

Van Cleve. Clionian. 

She neither molests nor tvishes to be molesle. 



ScoU High. Tole^ 



JENNA BEE SHETTERLY 



MARY SHIELDS 





n 

Belmont School. Columbus. ^^9fl^ ^^B 

U <nild that men only knew hoii- truly great I am. Ij^^L *" ^^m 

ORPHA ^^P^i^^^l 

.,.3i: ...... .-..., m 

.4s lor me. let me keep to my studies. ^^^KkL^^^^ 

DLRWOOD SMITH ^^^^i ^^H 

Technical Research. ^^^^^H^^H 

With all thy faults thee the ^^^^^^^^^1 

the ^^^^^^^^^^^H 



Page Forty-Three 




CHARLES SMITH 
Moundsville, W. Va. 
OrchcBtra. Chetr Leader. C 

Wifft ardor, zeal, and pep he did . 



FRED B. SMITH 



LEONARD SMITH 



ORVILLE SNYDER 



Demosthenes, Orville has idet 



RUSSEL SNYDER 



having nothing to 3a>, keeps still. 



VERNA STEWART 




Y. W. C. A. Club. 



MARIE STOECKLEIN 



ELIZABETH STIART 





MacDowell. Glee Club. 
C. A. Club. 
on and tireless norker. 




CATHERINE SURER 



Y. W. C. A. Club. Glee Club. 



The living example of the value of 



JERROLD SWANK 



Fairvie». Teehnical Resc 

•■Forgive me if 1 blush.' 



Edison. Agori 



DOROTHY SWITZER 



Y. W. C. A. Club. Basketball. 
of those uho think the world i 



Pnge Forty-Four 





ISABEL SWOPE 

Y. W. C. A. Cluh. Ba.kelball, -21 

Dark uoi her hair, and bright her eye. 

ELIZABETH THOMAS 

HuETman. Graphic Arls. 

Nothing ao hard but work will find it out, 

EDWARD TOBIAS 

Van Cleve. Technical Research. 

'm not tnzy, but I just don't feel like workir 

ALYSS LNCER 

A clever, high-mannered, young lady. 

DEAN UPSON 

Nilro, W. Va. 

Geopraphical. 

With his music he drives dull care away. 

IRENE LRBAN 



ELSIE VORIS 

Dorian Private School. Paducah, Ky. 

V. \( . (;. A. Club. Eccrilean. Basketball. '19. '20. 

niil me discourse and I iiiU enchant thine ear. 

DOROTHV WAGNER 






CHRISTINA WAHL 



basketball, how happy I should be. 





PRINCESS WEHRLEY 
Hawlhorne. 




Page Forty-n 



ROBERT WELCHANS 
Hawthorne. 
He "keeps the noiseless tenor of 

HUGH WELLMEIER 



RAY WELSH 




RICHARD WESTERFIELD 



CLINTON WHEELER 

Forum. Orchestra. 

;n of fetv ivords fire the be 

THELMA WILLIAMSON 



LETHA WILKINSON 

Jamestown, Ohio. 

a. Board of Director 

Committee on Committees, 

"Han^ sorrmv — Zef's be mer 

EVELYN WITHOFT 



CARROLL WOODS 

Van Cleve. 

I. Y. W. C. A. Club. 



KAHL WODITSCH 
of Dayton. Technical Research. 

;i7en( and pass for a philosopher. 



ELIZABETH WOGOMAN 



FAITHE WOLFE 




Page Forly-Six 




KA HERINE WOODWARD 
Ha»lhornc. 

Y. W. C. A. Club. 



SELL DAVIS 





Webb City, Mo. 


Ev-ry man 






MARIE WOODRIDGE 


f 


rankforl, Ky. Athena. 


One „l 1 


,o,e people who let othars mmd rheir 




WILSON ORMES 




Central. 


B, i, „„ firs 


hose or in school, he can calch anylh 




ROBERT ZEHRING 


Longfellow. 

Philoiimthean. Social Science. Hi Y. 

President, '20. Commi.lee on Commitlees, 'Zl 

Board of Directors. -21. 
Auditorium Debate. Editor-in-Chief. Staff '19 


Rcsponsibil 


ry srovitates to him who can shoulder i 




EDNA VON BERGE 




Agora. Y. W. C. A. Club. 


Sunshine and good humor aU the world over. 




ROSELLA ZEHRING 




Ed. son. 




If I don-l know. I ask. 




ELCENE HAERLIN 




Garfield. 


Forum. Ccopraphical. Glee Club. 


He 


has been faithful to his purpose. 




Page Forty-Seven 



iffliiailitfhriiFBiiiiii 



The Class of 1921 in 1940 

IBOUdHT a loyoly red and black pencil today and the queerest thing 
hapjiened 1 As I was boarding a sti-eet car in front of the shop, the 
proprietor called out, "Wait, I sold you the wrong pencil; that one 
is not for sale I" As I hesitated, he cried out impatiently, "Bring it 
back, and you can have two — no. three others." But the car had started 
before he finished his speech, so I called out that I would return it 
tomorrow. There wa.s no need of exciting myself over a pencil. 

This evening, as I held the pencil loosely in my hand, I laughingly 
said, "Wherein. O Pencil, lies your remarkalde value?" To my amaze- 
ment, the jiencil. moving slowly over a sheet of paper which lay before 
me, wrote: "Tlie jiower of prophecy." I knew then why the shopkeeper 
was loath to part with it. "Can you prophesy everything?" I a.sked. 
The answer wa.s "Yes." "Then di.«iclose to me the future of my friends 
and class-mates, in the year 1940." The pencil, gliding gracefully over 
the page, wrote the following: 

"The city of Dayton, Ohio, has just enjoyed a mammoth fair, carnival 
and exhibition combined. The affair was planned under the able leader- 
ship of Mayor Switzer and the other commissioners, Ruth Prior, Eliza- 
beth Folger, Justin Compton and John Kramer. All patriotic citizens 
were a.sked to offer theii' services. Kobert ilcConnanghey, county coroner, 
and former president of the class of '21 of Steele High School, called on 
Commissioner Compton, the former secretary. They decided that the 
class of '21 might have a reunion and lM>ost Dayton at the same time. 
After consultation with all the available members of the class, their 
plan wa.s adopted. Due to the ])art the graduates of '21 ]dayed, the 
carnival was a great success. 

"This way, ladies and gentlemen, to hear the world renowned opera 
singer, Paulo Bungero. who will now entertain us. He will be followed 
by the bi-others I'pson and the brothers F'unkhouser. the most popular 
quartette in all vaudeville," thus announced the guide, as the "exhibition- 
carnival" opened. "I beg your pardon," said a large, stout lady to the 
guide, "but is your name JIc(iinnis?" "No. madame, ^Ir. Charles Smith, 
at your service." The lady, satisfied, returne<l to her husband, ^Ir. Fred 
Keel, a well known liard-\\ are dealer, and masterfully pushed him through 
the crowd to see the dramatic and musical perft)rmance. 

Page Forty-Eight 



The program was continiions, with no stojjs foi- l»i-pnMi. Aft(M- tlip 
quartette, Miss Gweudolyn Weeks, a professioiiiil cntcrtaiiici-, dclinlitcd 
the audience by rendering "Twinkle, twinkle, little star" set to imisic 
written by the well known coni])oser, Elizabeth Stuart. I'^ditli Saner 
and Eriesson Poling, ])rofessional acrobats, then gave a sliort act. .Miss 
Elsie \'oris, a jiopnlar imitator, "l)rouglit ddwn tJic Jinii.sc" liy licr iiiiila- 
tion of Ko1)crt Knee as "Hamlet. " .Mr. Knee and his leading lady, .Miss 
Pauline ("nrtncr, were unable to attend as tlu'v \v<'re toniing Kngland in 
Shakes]iearean plays. .Mu.sic hivers were deligliled to hear .Miss 
Elizabeth .McConnangliey, Die greatest pianist since I'aderewski, Theima 
.Tidnison, famons cellist, and Letlia AVilkinson and Velma llolhiway, 
both of whom are members nf the .Metro]iolitan Opera House Co. The 
concluding number was a mas(|ne entitled "The Year," given liy the 
"Hermiue Schwai-tz School of Classic Dancing." Irene Crhan, Dorotliy 
I'oehm, Florence Kili'y, and .Margant ilalteuum as the "four Seasons" 
won great coniiuendatiou. 

The famous jiersonages in the audience received as much attention 
as tlie "show." Ilernuin Olt, Secretary of the Treasury, was thei-e, 
favoring everyone with his broad suiih'. He was acc(un])anied by his 
secretary, Ralph Shoemake. who kejit him posted on the latest news. 
It was rumored that Mr. Shoemake received great training in newspaper 
reading in high school. C.eorge Barte, audiassador to Spain, and Charles 
Hoey, U. S. Consul at Bagdad, were thei-e ; 
asseud)lage was further brightened by Cm 
Kalamazoo, Michigan. 



This 


brilli 


ant 


political 


Uiaw, 


ex-d(i 


',g-ca 


tcher of 


to ].r 


eviMit 


loc: 


d iioliti- 


et Ev; 


iins ai 


id C 


'atherine 


from 


Ohio 


, in^ 


dsted oi' 



Although the city manager. Berkdoll, tried U 
cians from disturliiug or exciting the cro\\(ls, \'io 
Suber, rival candidates for the office of Senatrix 
distributing campaign literature and making stump speeches. Mis> 
Suber, backed by Mary IMusselmau, a very influential p(ditical leailer, won 
favor at firet but Miss Evans surpassed her in number of followers later. 
The cause of ^liss Evans' success was a course in speaking, all known 
varieties, given by Miss Nathalie Larson and Miss Elizabetli Coonder. 
The .Misses Larson and Cooiuler were exjierts in their line, speaking with 
an ease and tinish that conu's only after much experience. 

There were many industrial exhibitions. The Plnndiers, Painters, 
Paperhangers and Plasterei-s had a large and interesting exhibit. There 
was a model house, constructed by the well known contractor, Hngli Well- 
nieir, jiainted by Edward Tobia.s, papered by Kenneth Bench, jdastered by 
John Shank and pijied by Fred Smith. These gentlemen were all pronu- 
uent in their lines of business. 

Page Forty-lSine 



The ladies were entliusiastic iu their praise of the beautiful clothing 
displayed by the various tailors and dressmakers. The lovely old rose 
crepe paper evening gown, designed by SwLsher and Swope, was the 
favorite creation. The second favorite was a clever little afternoon frock 
of tea-green taffeta, presented by the Chamberlain, Gibson, and Hadeler 
Co. The skating costumes of Stoeeklein and Weireter were also voted 
as "just too sweet for words." The ladies could not understand why 
their husbands Avere so interested in the wireless outfit displays of Snyder, 
Swank and Snyder, or the fan dynamometers of the Welsh Electrical Co. 

The inventors' union, leaders of which were John Blocher, Robert 
Foose, Keith Custis and Da-vid Prugh held a uiass meeting there. All 
agreed that their first inventions were excuses to stay up late and study 
their high school lessons. Also, a model "AVeekly meeting of the Tuesday 
Ladies' Club" was held. Short talks were delivered by JMiss Jane McCann 
and Miss Elizabeth Folger, professors of Biology at Denison. Robert 
Zehring, Professor of Zoology at Harvard also gave an interesting talk 
on the evolution of the dodo. Dr. George Owings, Insomnia specialist, 
Miss Carroll Woods, a trained nurse, and Dr. McLean, a well known 
dentist, gave short talks on public health. After thanlcing the per- 
formers for their kindness, the president <»f the Club, INIiss Alma Linx- 
weiler, asked the members to tell the audience of the value of their Club 
work. Those Avho spoke were, Grace Leonard, Dorothy Mai"k, Pauline 
Bauer, Panliue Dillsworth and :Mi-s. Yladimie Ejokfsowsky (formerlv 
Rosalie Hohler. ) 

Every evening a dance was held under the supervision of the dancing 
masters, James Herman and Basil Leever. These gentlemen preferred 
the waltz to all dances and deplored the tendency of the J^oung folks to 
skip or hop about the room. They were very strict. The music was 
provided by Burgher's Band, directed by Shelby himself. The members 
of the band were Richard Mote, Harry Sefton, Abraham Rosenthal, and 
Clinton Wheeler. 

For those who liked excitement, an automobile race was held among 
Pauline Chaney, Helen Quartel and Bernice Berger, all noted siwrts- 
women. Helen got the lead, and would have won if her mechanic, 
Robert Baumheckel, hadn't overlooked a leak in the gasoline tank. 
Bernice Berger won, for Pauline Chaney's car overturned. No damage 
was done, as the racer was a Ford, constructed by The Ruth Ford Co., 
and therefore indestructible. 

In a booth with a large sign "Poetiy Penned While You Wait," 
Pauline Schroy, lona Pence, and Louise Kramer did a thriving business. 
IMlss Schroy's best works were sonnets, Miss Pence's free verse, while 

Page Fifty 



Miss Kramer's masterpiece was tlie delightful allegorical pastoral entitled 
"Ye Pleasant ^Vanderings in the Land of Dickens." A niiuiatnre book- 
shop, across the aisle, sold books written and edited by Daytonians. The 
best sellers were, "Autobiography of a Cartoonist," by Richard Wester- 
field, "Philosophical and Psychological Lectures of tlie 20th Century" by 
Frances Lehman, "Modernized Translation of Vergil's Aeneid" by 
Katherine Scott, "The Debater's Helping Hand'' by Herbert Kahn and the 
"Encyclopedia of Jokes" by Russel Brundige. 

Dorothy Crew and Katherine Johnson, piiotographers, took many 
pictures of the exhibition. These were made into post cards and sold in 
a booth presided over by Marion Harvey and Margai'et Haas, expert 
saleswomen. Jeanette Crew, the famous sculptress, Josephine Hastings, 
a sketcli ai'tist, and Ruth Kimball, a maker of pottery, offered their wares 
for exhibition and sale in a booth opposite the lemonade stand. Tliis 
was very popular, as it was managed by Ruth McPherson and Priscilla 
Miller, expert caterers. 

Eva Miller, Charlotte Neidhamer, Nellie Liddil and Linwood Hoover, 
all very active missionary workers, constantly attended the exhilntion 
in the hope of interesting some of the spectators in their work. They 
were aided in this noble task by the Rev. David McConnaughey and the 
great foreign missionary, Robert Corwin. They were not very successful, 
as eveiyone was using his money in betting on the great boxing match 
between Ollie Klee and Jack Keefer. As neither Klee nor Keefer won, 
Lysle Butler, the referee, asked that since no one had either lost or won 
money in betting, they should donate the amount they had betted to tlie 
missionary cause. For this genierous act the missionary workers gave 
him a vote of thanks. 

Some of the class of '21 were unable to attend. Pauline Doughty, 
New York Police Commissionei", and her two best policewomen sent their 
regrets. Charles Breisch, entangled in an old suit over a colt, could 
not come. Florence Bleck, chairman of the Needlework Guild of Hono- 
lulu, was not present, neither were her helpers, Catherine Paul and Ruth 
Orr. It was rumored that Alyss Unger, Rozella Zehring and others were 
happily married.. Still others were not located. The city commissioners 
gained so much popularity, however, during the exhibition, that the*,- 
congi'atnlated each other on their chances of re-election. 

The pencil stopped. "Please go on," I liegged. It remained motion- 
less. I waited and waited without result. I have lost hope of ever 
seeing it write again and tomorrow it shall go back to its rightful owner. 
I intend to keeps its prophecy to see whether it be true or false. 

Catherine Suber, '21. 

Page Fifty-One 




ProUcUd^yLeo 



SENIORS 



^JimAalUtihknmmr 



Farewell Song 

Words by PAULINE SCHROV Music by ELIZABETH STUART 

I. 

For three years now we've trod the halls 

Of Steele, and learnetl to love 
Each stone within her dear old walls, 

That tower all else above. 
The high ideals that she has taught 

Shall e'er our guide-star he; 
Through all the earth we'll sing her worth, 

O'er mountain, plain, or sea. 

Chorus. 

And now farewell to Steele so dear, 

We'll love thee true and long. 
Where'er we be, we'll honor thee 

In story and in song. 

II. 

We love the friends Steele's brought to us. 

We love her colors, t-oo, 
We've tried to do the tasks she's set, 

The best that we could do. 
We hold within our heart of heai'ts, 

Her image and her name; 
Where'er we go, the world shall know 

Her glory and her fame. 

Chorus. 

And now farewell to Steele so dear. 

We'll love thee true and long, 
Where'er we be, we'll honor thee 

In story and in song. 



Page Fifty-Four 



Who's Who in the Senior Class. 

WHO is who ill tlic Senior class? Tiiis most iini)ortant (jucstion 
lias puzzled many of the Seniors themselves. They have stmlietl 
and fretted for the answer, but all to no result. At length one 
promising- person suggested that we liavc a contest, so that each Senior 
might enter the race in the capaiity for wliich lie might think him- 
self best fitted. Then three of the best friends of the class would be asked 
to act as judges. These would be Imagination, Sense of Humor, and ( 'om- 
mon Sense, all of whom wei'e to promise to give a fair diMision. Tliis 
was no sooner said than done, and the results follow : 

Tn the list of the most intelligent were many favorites, including 
George Owings, Pauline Doughty, Nellie Liddil, and June Dilts. George 
was awardefl the decision because of his knowledge of the art of sleeping 
which is so little known to some of us. 

That of the most coquettish was another diffirult decision. Natalie 
Larson, Ruth ^IclMierson, Jane ^IcCann, Gwendolyn. Weeks, Katheiine 
Scott, and Catherine Suber were all close ccmtestants. AVe thought that 
Gwendolyn would cai'ry the vote, but we were mistaken. The judges 
decided in favor of petite Catherine. 

Cuteness was awarded to Ray AVelsh. Basil Leever was a strong 
rival, but it was decided that he couldn't fill the i)hu(' as well as Kay. 

The decision as to the best in the art of argument was unanimously 
awarded to Robert Knee. It is indeed a (hdight to hear him argue. 
Sometime just close yonr eyes and listen and you will tliink that the 
shade of the departed Burke is rigid tliere JK't'ore you. 

Modesty is indeed a fine characteristic, and tlie choice was hard 
to make. This peculiarity seemed to be most common among the Seniore, 
owing to the large number who entered the contest. Robert McCon- 
naughey, Pauline Chaney, Letha Wilkinson, Shelby Burgher, Robert 
Foose, Finances Lehman, and Dorothy Crew were all popular rivals. The 
judges finally decided on Frances Lehman because of her habit of blush- 
ing whenever she sees anyone looking in her direction. 

Good nature was to be awarded next and Betty Folger and ^Margaret 
Halteman were the closest of rivals for this honor, when suddenly Sense 
of Humor vanished and Imagination faded away. Of course it was 
impossible to go on with the contest with only one judge so it had to be 
closed until these judges could be secured again. If anyone happens 
to find Imagination or to see Sense of Humor in his wanderings through 
life, will you let us know? We should like to award the remaining honors 
to the most deserving in the class. 

MAK.JOUIE McClueu. '21 

Page Fifty-Five 



Debates 

Instead of an inter-scliohistic debate, siicli as was lield with Slioi't- 
ridge last .year, it was decided that a debate siionid l>e given in the Steele 
Anditorinni for the benefit of tlie wliole scliool and that individnals shonhl 
enter the Denisonian Oratorical Contest. 

Preliminaries were held for the Anditorinni Debate the latter part 
of April. From the contestants, Robert Zehring, Sanl Brasely, Justin 
Coniptou, Kobert ;Mc< Nmnanghey, Lysle Butlei- and Franklin McCann 
were chosen for the Anditorinni debate, witli .John Blocher as alternate. 
The question debated was: Kesolved, "That the Philippines should be 
given their Independence." The boys very diligently prepared their 
argnnients for the del)ate wliich was held in tlie Anditorimn ^lay 25. 

Four Kspeakers have also been chosen to represent the class at the 
Commencement exercises. They aie Louise Kramer, Frances Lehman, 
Robert Zehring and Rol)ert ^McConnanghey. 



Another evi<lencc of tli 
by Steele's entrants into t 
Contest. Robert Zehring ( 
Frances Lehman spoke on 



iiteresf taken in jinblic speaking was shown 

prcliniinaiies fm- the Denison ()i-atorical 

se the "Jaiianesc* (Question" for discnssion, 

'Suitable Reward for our Ex-service Men," 



and Robert McConnaughey on the "Philix>piue Sitnation." All three 
contestants made very good speeches. Robert McConnaughey was chosen 
to represent ^Montgomery County at the finals to be held at Denison 
University, Granville, Ohio. 

Next year we shall again debate Shortridge here in Dayton in onr 
own Auditorium. The boys in the present Junior class are already antici- 
pating an interesting contest. 



Page Fijty-Seven 




Page Fifty-Eight 




WE TD THREE'' TDfmSm4kr ATTHEiRrET 

JUNIORS 



Page Fifty-Nine 



History of the Class of 1922 



We, the ("lass of -22. took oui 


1- -re; 


It iiluu^c 


fioiii tlie _!>Tade scliool 


into hij>h scliool, witli nil its iicwiic 


ss an 


(1 added !■(■ 


sjionsiliilities, mnch as 


tlie small lioy who is tlii-own into ; 


;i sl:a 


11-"- 1 1 


for his first swininiinj'- 


lesson. 









Onr first j^xd was I'ai-ker lli.yli School. Ilei-e we were -;iven a privi- 
lege which has not been the i^ood foitnne of all I'l-esliinen to enjo.v. This 
privilege was to carry on a system of self-.<i(ivernmenl. modeled aft<'r our 
owTi city gdvernuHMit. As a i^ood start for our Iiii;h sclioul career, we 
made a success of this venture. Then, we were n ady for a deeiier stream 
with a tugging current where (uily the fittest survives. The stream was 
Steele High School, and the curi-eni was Creater Kes])oiisil)ility. AVe 
were permitted to pick sulijerts from a nuudier of courses. These were the 
college, general art, industrial, and comuiercial courses. It re(|uired 
much thought to inck that course wiiich would best educate us for our 
life's work. At the beginning of the first year au at^tractive recejition 
was given to us by the Juniors. This So]diouioi-e y(^ar was occupied, 
generally, in getting acipiainted. We were aide(l in this by the various en- 
joyable entertainments given liy Hie I'^uglisli classes. .Most (d' our mem- 
bers were soon rei)reseuted in some spicial activity, either di-aunitic, 
literary, social, athletic, or musical. 

Our .Tuni(n- year commenced with a receiition to the Sojiliomores, 
The wlnde year has been au active one for the mendieis of '22. From 
the time when we eutei-ed Steele, the Steele spirit has rooted itself 
deep into our hearts. AVe have tried to manifest it by giving to Steele 
the best that is in us. Our scholarship is high. This was shown by 
the twenty-one Junior names out of fifty-six uauies on the merit list, ^^'e 
have chosen exceedingly capable oflticers to had our class. \Ve justly 
claim to have one of the b(st class organizations which has ever been 
wi'thin the walls of Stecde. Our good fellowshij) and ability to work to- 
gether were jiroven by the iuimense success i\\' the "Juuioi- F(dlies of 
1921." We ai-e more than jiroud to weai- the rings and plus which are the 
emblems of our (dass. We hope lo make our Seni(n- year uiore ])rotitalile, 
if possible, than our Junioi' year. Our ambition is to inake "1!»22" the 
best class that ever was graduated froui Steele. 

Finally, we shall be ready to idunge into life with its ditticulties to 
be faced and overcome. May the Class n\' "22 ]:ass threuiiih life with the 
same success which has nuirked all its undertakings in Steele High 
School. 

Ruth Oekjer, '22. 

Page Sixty-One 




Page Sixty-Tivo 



iini^iifii^iiiiiifriiii 



Sophomore Class 

Only a sliort time ago we were Freslinicn, with tlic pride, tlie tliimglits, 
and the hopes of Freshmen. Now \\e are Sophomores. Onr great dream 
has been realized. At last, Ave are a part of Steele. 

Altliough we Avere at tirst somewluit looked down npou by the 
Juniors and Seniors, as they were very pri>bal)ly looked doAvn upon when 
they were Sophomores, we soon i)roved that we could hold our own with 
the best of them, ilany of the class of '23 have, this year, distinguished 
themselves in their studies. They have done this not only for themselves, 
but also for their class and school. Let us not forget, in addition, that 
the work of the class as a whole has been very good. 

In athletics our class is especially strdug, jiaving many athletes of 
real ability. The Seniors, graduating this year, need never tear that the 
fame and glory which Steele has won for hei-self along this line will ever 
be lost. 

Not only in athletics, but also in the various societies, is the class of 
'23 well represented. The society work is a very imi)ort;nit part of the 
school activities, and it is encouraging to note the interest which the 
Sophomores have taken in it. 

It is now our privilege to carry forward the banner of the Red and 
Black, to live for it and to work for it. Steele demands our best, and 
Steele will receive our best. The most of our historj' lies before us, the 
greatest work is yet to be done. What the future holds in store for the 
next two years, none can foretell. Nevertheless, be assured that the class 
of '23 will bring honor and glory to the school we love the best. 

Robert Young, '23 



Page Sixty-Three 





UTERATU1\E. 



The Stranger's Story at the Inn 

IT was some years aj^o,"" heiiaii the stnui.uei-. talkiu.u to a lirouj) of 
]ieoi)le at the little inn in the northern part of England, "that I 
was travellnji' in the sontli of Africa. There were ei.nht in onr party, 
l)esi(les the natives whom we took alonn. ^^'e went partly for explora- 
tion, and partly for biological sjjecimens for the British Musenm. One 
of onr party was a yonng man wlio came fi-om somewhere in tliis very 
region, llow he came to tie of the ]iarty, 1 do not now I'emendier, for 
1 was tlie last to join. It is siifticient to know that he was yoimg and 
ad\entiirous and greatly interested in onr woi-k. 

\\i' liad lieen several weeks on our journey, and had made consider- 
alile iHogress with our collections. We were coming ever nearer the 
unexi)lored region, when we camped one night on the banks of an almost 
unknown river. It had never been explored more than a few miles above 
the site of oui- jiresent camp, and we were very desirous to explore it 
furthei'. It was, lutwever, a dangerous, hazardous undertaking. It was 
imiKissible for the whole ])arty to go, and the young man, John Palmer, 
by name, tilled w\t\\ a desire to be the tirst to exj)lore the mysteries of the 
stream, offered to command a small party for the i>ur]iose. He had 
shown smdi remarkable courage and skill all through our journey, that 
we judged it wi.se to allow hin\ to command a small expedition to 
travel towards the source of the river, w Idle tlie rest of our party remained 
in encampment on its banks until his return. We allowed him two 
weeks for exploration, thinking that it might not be wise for him to go as 
far as the source, and that in a week he could go as far as would be 



The evening liefore his deiiarture, he came to my tent, and talked 
to me for a long time. I had taken (piite a liking to him. and 1 think he 
likeil me in return. W'i- talked much of home, as men do when they are 
in distant lands. 

Before he left, he gave uie a gold watch that he had been carrying 
with him, tobl me to keep it for hiui until his return, and if anything 
sho\dd hajijien, to endeavor to return it to his father. When men 
travel in the jungles, it is the common thing to expect disaster, and 
guard against it. 



I'li^e Six 



T sinv liiiii (.If tlic next iiKniiin;: mid \\c \v:i<(lic(l nnlil tlic Ix-iid of 
the rivci- hid liiiii Iroiii mir view. \Vr waited I wo weeks for liiiii. iiiid on 
llie fifteeiitli da.v lie liad iml i-el ui-iied. We leii<itlieiied oni- stay (o lliice 
weeks, tiiiallv lo a iikhiIIi. We seiil another paity u|i the ii\-ei- to look 

for liiiii, hut at llie end nf a week they ea hack witliout having toiiiid 

a trace of him. As sorry as we were to yo, we could do nothin}"- else, 
since we had made an aiireement with him, tliat if he returned and found 
US lione, he should <yo back to the coast and await us there. 

Several months later, oiir expedition tinisiied, we arrived at tlie little 
coast town, hoiiinn a.uainst hojie that we should tind John there. 15ut we 
were disa]i|iointed, nothing had been seen oi- heard of hiiii. ^^'e were 
forced to return to Kniilaud witliout him. 

I have liiveii up hojie of ever seeini; him auain. hut I have not yet 
-iven u]i lio])e of tinilin- his father. I should like to ijive him the watch 
and tell him what I know of his son's bravery, and the exj.editiou on 
which he was lost. .My |)ur]pose has never been weakened, in sjiite of 
the fact that our iiajiers, amoiiii them his address, were lost in the juniile, 
and that I never knew his last name, lie called hims(df i'almer, but wp 
all knew the name was not his own." 

The stran.iicr sat for a few uumieiits, silent. All his listeners were 
deeply moved, but instead of liein.i; sad and thou-htful at the conclusion 
(.f his story, they all hxdced ji-yfully toward a youn- man who had just 
entered, unseen liy tin- st rammer, lie came slowly uji to the tire, where 
the man was .sittinf>\ and said, "My friend, do you not remember me?" 
The stranger, almost overwhelmed at seeing' the man whom he had long 
ago given up as lost, was hardly able to s])eak. ^^'hpn he found his voice 
he said joyfully, ".My boy, I have never dar<'d to hope for this moment." 

When they had both talked a great deal, and laughed, and the 
stranger had found to his amazement that the inn keejier was John's 
father, he thought to ask J(din how he had been able to reach the coast, 
and how his jiarty had fared in the jungh'. 

"We went up the river as far as we were able," said John, "and 
then struck into the iuteiior. I have many wonderful things to lelate 
to you, but more of that later. Briefly, I fell ill with a fevei- in one of 
those horrible swamjis, and had to be carried many miles to a jilace where 
mv men could build a cam]). There they tended me with great care, and 
after many, many weeks I recovered. When we finally reached the coast, 
you had already left for England, so 1 joined another party, and i-eturned 
to the interior. 1 have been in lOngland now only two months. I have 
never ceased wondering about you and the rest of our jiaity. and it is 
one of the haiipiest events of my life to see you again." 

Ldiisi: Ki!.\Mi:it. 'IM. 

I'lige Sixty-Seven 



— -^^nBii^iirTii^ii 



My Book Friends 

As I drew the Avindow curtains, I decided our library' was the nicest 
place in the world. Outside a few belated people hurried home- 
ward. The rain pattered ceaselessly against the panes and the 
bare arms of tlie trees rattled with every fresh gust of wind. I poked 
the fire into a bright blaze, then settled for a quiet and comfortable 
evening, thinking of the lines: 

"Some still removed place will fit. 
Where glowing embers through the room. 
Teach light to counterfeit a gloom." 

Of course I would read something. Tiiat part of the room where 
my books are kept was mysteriously dark, but I knew where each favorite 
stood on its shelf and could easily find what I wantetl. 

While I was trjing to decide whether I would rather go to King 
Arthur's Court or to Treasure Island Avith Jim Hawkins, I suddenly 
saw coming toward me from the .shadows, an unmistakable figure — it 
was that of Little Boy Blue. I stared with amazement and delight. I 
asked him a question but he onlj- pointed behind him, blew his toy 
horn and was gone. Tlien I saw that he was the first of a long line of 
people, coming from the dii-ection of the bookshelves. There was Alice 
in Wonderland, who looked just as I had always known she must, with 
her golden curls and pink dress. Several other children danced straight 
down from my tattered nursery rhyme book. 

Jack, the Giant Killer, with his golden hen under his arm, gave me 
one of the magic beans as he passed. 

There was a bluish-green light and the Genie of Aladdin's Lamp 
came forward. He faded away before I could ask him the way to the 
treasure garden. 

He was followed by four "Little Women, lady-like Amy, Jo, with 
her rebellious hair, Meg and little Beth. They were chattering gaily 
about Laurie. 

I heard someone say, "I never shall forget Mr. Micawber'' and the 
inimitable Mrs. ilicawber came past, leaning on the arm of her depen- 
dable spouse who had just finished the words, "Something will surely 

Page Sixty-Eight 



turn up." They were followed by several other Dickens characters, — 
Sarah Gamp, with her bottle of gin for emergency, Squeers in his suit of 
scholastic black, and Old Peggoty leading that dear child, David 
Copperfield. Peggoty was laughing so hard over something, that one of 
the buttons popped right off her bi-oad back into my lap. A melancholy 
figure glided past but he couldn't fool me. I knew him — he was Sidney 
Carton. 

There was the glint of tircliglit on silver mail — then came Sir 
Parsifal, the Pure, with some holy vi.sion in his eyes. Behind him with 
slow, graceful carriage walked Elaine, the Lily Maid of Astolot. She 
was lovelier than I had ever imagined any person could l>e. She carried 
pressed to her bosom, a silken, embroidered cover for a shield. 

Violet Evaxs, '21. 



The Maple Tree 



Little red leaves on yon wee maple tree 
Oh, dance with the joyous young breeze! 
Youth of the forest incarnate art thou 
Frolicking 'neath the old trees. 

Against tlie black trunks of the oak and the elm. 
How brightly your gay garments shine! 
How willing the sunshine caressing each leaf 
Thus duty and fun to combine. 

Oh, laugh, little maple, in sunshine and wind ! 
The rain soon will fall, wet and cold. 
Frolic in gladness while youth is thine own. 
For vou must be staid when vou're old. 



Pauline Schroy. '21. 



Page Sixty-Nin 




Page Seventy 





Sweet .Fiiiie, tlioii soul of love and voiitli 
With joyous, warm life <>lo\viuj;. 

The whole world smiles to see thee come, 
Aud si-hs to see thee -oiu<;-. 



Page Seventy-One 




EX UDRIS 

DiMDN MU5EUPr 



This hook plate was drawn by Toui Johnston for a contest offered hy 
the Dayton ^lusenni of Arts. It is planned to hold a similar contest next 
Aear. 



Page Seventy-Two 




ORGANIZAnOM 




Eccritean 



l.(.l ISi: UlCKllAM 
I'An.lNK ClIA.NKV 

Fi.ditiM: Bi.KCK 
Jkannet'1'io Ckkw 
Elizabeth I'oi.cki; 
;Mai{(;aket H ai.tk.ma.n 
Katii eiu n ]■: Joh ns( )x 
TnKi.MA Johnson 

LoriSK KltAMKl! 

lOtANc i;s Lkh.man 
Ai.MA I-iNN\vi:n.i:K 



.Mah.iouik McCi.rin; 
•Tank .McCann 

VAA'/.AV.EWI McCoNNAl 
UVVU I'KIOl! 
I'L0I!1:NCK IvU.KV 
DoitOTHY KOEHM 
IIEU.MIN-E St'HWAUZ 

Catheihne Srr.EU 

hoUOTHV SwlT/.EIt 
lUKNK TkISAN 

Kisn: \-(.i!is 



I'^LVA Beck 
Phyllis ISurAusAiMiH 
Veka Dklscanh- 
Ulth (Jeicei! 
IOthel (iltoTII 
I5eati!1(E Howell 

I'^LOKENCE KitA.MKIt 



(iEOItCLV llAV.MONlt 

Makjouie IJoth 
Vii;(;lnl\ Kowe 

IxLTH SCHAEEFEI! 
-IeAX SrHAEI'KEi; 

I'"loi!EN('e Stewaim 

KaI'IIEKINE ^^■A.M|•| 



I.OIS ^VEA^ 



Doiiis Hail 
Amelia Hickiia.m 

:MaI!IE IJiCKFLVM 
AfAUY lilSHOl" 

Helen Rko\vn 

ArAlULVUET KlJO\\N 



SOIMIO.MOKKS 

\'iU(;iNiA Fox 
FuANCEs Fr(;ENA Hi 
Elizaketh Jolly 
Anne Klei-lngeu 
I'ailine Meniienhai 
Kaihekine K'atii 



(\\uolyn coefman 
Jeannetie I>ei sca.mi- 



I'l.OKENCE r.MI'.ENHAr 

Si SAN Williams 
W/,/.voy— .Miss Ckace H. Stiveks 
fo/o/.s'— (ii-(MMi and wiiitc 

l/o//o--"('ari)e aiem" 
l)(ii/ of M (ct i II (/' -Thnv^dux 

I'ajie Sei 




Philomathean 



SENIORS 



George Barte 
John Blocker 
KussEL Bruxdige 
James FI-xkhouser 



David McCoxxaughey 
Robert McConxaughey 
Kenxeth Bench 
John Shank 



Robert Zehrixc 



John Becker 
Harold Dunpl\m 
Earl Hoover 
Philip Lebexderfer 



JUNIORS 



William Payne 

Miles Sheffel 
Charles Tyson 
Charles Wagner 



Donald Youxg 

SOPHOMORES 
Roger Bury Robert Sagebiel 

Howard Feight Willard Smith 

Fred Ftjnkhouser Richard Stowe 

Joseph Kitchen Nelsox Urbax 

George Marshall Richard Wagxer 

Donald Noble William Wright 

Adri.sor — Mr. E. G. Pumphrey 
Motto — "Give something, take something" 
Colors — Cardinal and steel gray 



Page Seventy-Seven 




Spur Literary Society 



SKNIOIi 



DoUOTHV ('HA.Ml'.KUl.AlN 

Dorothy Crkw 
Pauline Doiqhty 
^'10LET Evans 

T.rCILE (iIHSOX 

Maiujauet Haas 
Catiieuine Hadei.ek 
^Iauia.n Hauvey 
.TosEi'iii.vE IIastincs 

10 VE 



^■ll!(;I^'IA Heak 
Helex Huow.n 
Helen ('la(;ett 
:Mai!LE ("olvln 
Ltcille Crist 
Alice Edwarhs 
Nora <;au.mon 
Elizap.eth <!n.i 
Ethel iJrv 



LYX WiTl 

IT'XIOK! 



SOPIIO.MOKK 



IlLMA BrUKIIAUIlT 

Helex Burxett 

Helex CLEMMEI! 
IMauy Dexnisox 
:Mary (;Ar(;LKR 
Jeaxette (;noss^L\x 
:>rAi'i)E Hakims 
Harriet Heui-.y 
Maucierite Hint 
Phyllis Keilm 



Klth Ki.mi'.all 
Pith McPhersox 
I'riscilla ;\Hllek 
]Mary .AH'sselmax 

TH']LEN (^lARTEL 

ViRGixiA Peel 
Kdith Saier 

Kl.IZAllETH StIART 

Isai'.el Swoi'e 



Kathkvn IIaiix 

(JRACE .McILHEXNY 

Peila X ester 
Mary Pickrel 
Katiiryn Plummer 
Charlotte Weaver 
Kathryn U'oi.e 
Pt'th Voincs 
Kathisyn ZlI.E 



Kathekixe Kim i-.a ll 
Helen ]\L\rox 
Parolixe ^Farkev 
Sarah McClarv 
Helen .Menhoza 
Jane Moore 

A'H!(iLNL\ MOOKE 

:Mary ()\vln(;s 
P'lTH Pickerel 
IMartha N'inson 



Marianna Wkkhn 

.U/r/.sor— :\liss Mary Alice Hinti 
Ciilins — Lavender and white 
.l/o//(.«— "Oil. for a s])nr to jiiick tli<' sides (.f 
Dnii of l/rr^/»(/~\\'ednesday 



Pag.e Seventy-Nine 




Forum Literary Society 



;hxi(>ks 



Kor.EUT r.dZAKTIl 

Shelhy liritciiKit 

Fl-OYl) ("AMKKON 
KOBEIiT COKWIX 
BURK ("lUNlTTK 
VU'TOU El.LKU 



Herschiol Cox 

C^IIAUI.ES EllWAKIlS 
IJU'IIAKl) 1>()\VKS 



.TUXIOUS 



Lkstei; El. lis 
-TosEi'ii Exsi. 
[Mark Fear 
Et(;exe Hae 
mssEi. SXYII 
Tlixtox Wii 

H. P^RU'SSON 

Joseph Kick 
Carle Wolk 



l'OLIX( 



SOl'llO.MOKES 
Roderick P.akek ^'oR^L\x Ne; 

:Masox I'.EXXER Carletox S: 

Paul McClellax Vaxce S.Mrr 

TiiEoKoRE .Merrill Charles St 

lA)RltEST \Vn.CO(K 

.If/ci.vor— ArcjrsT F. Foerste 
Cohirs — lMiri)l(' :)iul wliite 

.)/o//'.<— "Excelsioi'" 
Ihii/ nf l/rr/M/.v— Tlnirsdiiy 



I'ase Eighly-One 



Agora 

SENIORS 

El.I.A lillKLKU IT Kit .MIX 10 I'olII.MAN 

Elizai!i:tii ('(iomi.kk IMaky Siiiklus 

Lixwdoii IIoovKi; Patmxio Sciiuoy 

Dorothy McCi.auy ]\lAitii'; Stokckleix 

Eva Miller Hklkx Swish eu 

•rATHERIXE ^lorXTSTEI'IIEX EtIIEL >\'E1RI:TER 

ISAIIEI. (h;i.ESI!EE TlIELMA AViLLIA.MSOX 

IvITII (»I!I! LeTIIA WiT.KIXSOX 

Katiikyx Tai'l Caukoli, AVooiis 

JUNIORS 

Dorothy Ali.(;ire Lt'cy Dauskart 

Louise Barley Grace Hapxer 

Kathryx Burba Charlotte Lane 

Florexce Cakr Gladys Smith 

Alherta ('AitnEi! ;\Iau(;ari:t Sxyder 
Vera Welty 

SOPHOMOKES 

ZoE Beei.er Alberta Mehlbeuth 

Alice Davis Grace Moberly 

Patlixk Early Margaret Osbon 

DoxxA Hester Eliza Pickle 

Dorothy .M(i>EAX Jaxe Poxtius 

.idrisor — IIelex Iv. Burxs 

Colors — Kcd and wliite 
Ddi/ of Mcci'nifi — Tuesday 



Page Eighty-Three 



^\'A1.TI■;U I'.Uri'.AKKK 

Lysi.k IUti.ku 

.1a. NIKS llKU.MAN 

Kvi:ki;tt Layman 
Basil Li:kvi:k 

ErCJKNK Cktd.nk 
IlAUUY COSXHU 

Walter Feihu'son 
John HAitoLD 

(;E(»1!«;K IlATFIKI.n 



Gavel 



SEXlOKt 



JINIOKS 



KlCHARI) MoTK 
aEOUGE <)\VlN<:i 

David I'ur(;ii 

I'ltEl) inoEL 
Druwooi) Smi'i 



WlI.l.L\.M LOWKEY 
VeUL I'KKKINK 

Loris I'docK 
Thomas Suaukky 
.Tdii.x Vance 



SOl'IlO.MOKKS 

(;,,,m(;E 1)..NS..N <*AUI. SHANK 

James FAunEU 1^^^ ''^'^'''^ 

IK.WAUl. llAKTMAN ^l^KK Sl,(.ANI 

Kol'.EUT Wn.S.lN 

,,/,./.,.,,,. _.M,.. L. II. Seicleu 

('(,](, rx^\U-i\ and wliite 

]rnttn—y\r\ovy and tnitli 

Ddti nf l/rrh((.</^\Vc(lnt'sday 



Page Eighty-Five 




m^jm. 




r» 



a 



'S^^S>^^ 



'ffe^Tw^ 



u 



(^ 




t^im- 




SENIOIJS 

Harry Berkdoij. Kobert Knee 

Patttv Bttnger Cyrus Mead 

.TrsTix ("oMi'Tox Norman IJoiTZdiix 

KlClIAUI. lllOXI. RICKS (^URTIS ShAW 

•Teax .It)Xi:s :\[YI!(>X biEEKY 

OltVlI.LK SXYDEK 

Lawrexce Beau ^am LEiuoxsuEitiiKU 

Carl Boese ^.Vixstox Lee 

Carl Brown Uicuaud Schwartz 

IlERiiERT Ellis 1'avl Selz 

TlSCHER lIoEUXElt TVAX SmITII 

Orville Wricht 

SOPHOMOKKS 
Ai.KLVx Baler I^ay Penuoi. 

DoXALi. Barley C^harles Pfarrer 

:\!axs()X Bui ex Eli.uin S>[ith 

Pali, Eick.meyer Bouert Stoehr 

DOXALI. IlERSHEY (iEOUiJE TiSCIIEU 

James 1I()\vsare (M.arexce Wrkjht 

l,/,-/.,.o/-— Miss Kraxces Hlxter 
Colors- — Crimson ;in(l white 
IJdi/ of Mcctin;/ — Tuesday 



Pase Eighty-Seven 



Aurean 

SEXIOliS 

Maimokik 15iti:\\ stkii Ai:i..m.\ Ihni.dWAV 

Katiikyx IIai.i. Makv Knox 

Cl.AItA IIaKT.MA.V (JWKXIIOI.VX NN'lOKKS 

IJdSAI.Ii: lldHI.Ki: 1\UTII Wdl.F 

("ATUKKIXK W'oonWAUl) 

JUXIOKH 

Amck I'ei.i, Floukxck .Maktix 

Mai!V Davy (ioLDii: I'oktki; 

]\Iai!(:ai;i;t I''ii.i:i:i!T Kt'tii IJokmiiii.ht 

l"i;i:i)A (iAi.r.UAiTii IIaiiuikt KdsxAci.i-: 

TUi;VA IllCITSTKKMAX MaKV S( II.IKX I'.KUCKI 

KvKi.vx II()(ii> SrsAX ST(MK.Mi:vi:ii 

(ii.Aiivs Kaktsciik 1''i.(»i:i;x('k W'ouuki.l 

.MaI!I:I. \Vl!I(iIIT 

S(>I'II():\I()Ki:s 
:\lAK.n)i;iK r.oitixc Ijh isi; .Mii.i.ku 

Mii,i)i!i:i. liuATTKx Mautiia .Moti; 

>lii.iii!i;ii ('(Kii'KU .Makcaukt IM:xxv 

.7i:ax Colvili.k Dnitoniv Vorxc 

\'ik(;ixia Ki.ixi; .Mikiam /r.Mi'.itr.M 

Ailrlsor — Miss Cakkik A. I'.kkkxk 

('(,Jnrs--\\\\\v and white 

I/0//0 — "Iiiiliciiinir ayciidn" 

n<tij 0/ 1/rr^ /)(//— .Monday 



Pnge Eiy:hty-M 




Neotrophean Literary Society 



;ENi()iJt 



I'AILIXK CritTNK 

:Mai!(;aukt Davis 

;\Ill.I)UF.l) Dkauy 
IJOSAI.VX FUANK 
in-Tll F..KI. 



liESSU; I'.AUTdX 

:Mau(;auete K a in Kit 
Edna Bellk Uiamo 
Dorothy Kkii'ku 
KrTii Ki.i:riN(ii;i; 

Al-.MA KiKCAN 

('ATiir.KiNi: Km rii 



.TUNIOIJS 



LonsK Kkmi- 
Xkli.ik Liimii. 
Fanny Koskntiiai 
Kit 1 1 KosT 
I'^IOItKNCi: irissoN 



Dorothy Lonc 
Florknck 1>yk 
Ftch.i.i: >F\rshai.i. 

VF.RA .MclLHOSK 

Kith 1!ath\vay 
Fanny Thai. 
HicssiK Whi:i:i.i:.n 



SOIMIO.MDUFS 



Clarkk XoRRlS 
Fi.siK Strahor 
Koski.i.a Wasskr.man 
Mauki. Tinsi.ky 



(Uauys Fishkr 

THKI.MA For K.MAN 

:Mii,i.ri;u .Mm.i.s 
.Tankt .>Dm.ma 

. I, /r /.so/— .Miss Loiisk F. Mayi.r 

,/„/,„_"Tiiannuus V.-nun— Watcli your wonls 

f'o/o/-.v— Hluc ami wliitr 

Jhiy of M<< tiiiii— 'Vnv^ihiy 



Page Ninety-One 



Social Science Club 

SENIOKS 

John Hi.ociiki! IIkk.man oi.t 

TiTSSEI, RUT-NI.KJK ( JEOUCK OWINCS 

.Ta>[i:s FfXKiiorsKK AViuja.m I'katiiiou 

Lons McLiOAX Kexxktii Kkxch 

DaVII. .McCoXXArCllKY XOUMAX KOITZOIIX 

Kol-.KltT .MCCOXXAKMIKY KOP.KKT ZkIIKIXC 

•TrXIOHS 

.TOHX ]{K(KKK I'HlI.ll' LKKKXI.KKnn 

(\\i!i, HoKsio "William Lowukv 

Et(;i:xk ('ktoxk William I'avxk 



Hauoi.k Dtxiiam 



Loris I'oix'K 



Waltiok Eukmf.yki: Vicul Peuuixe 

^VALTI•;u FEU(irs()x Kichaud Schwautz 

TISCIIEU HOEUXKl! MiLES SHEFFEL 

Sam Tj:i!EXsitEU(;Ei! C'haules Tysox 

.loIIX ^'AX(•E 

SorilO.MOKKS 
:Maxs()X 1'.1!1kx •'•■-'^ Skiclek 

IloWAItl. llAHTMAX ^^AKK Sl.OAX 

DoXAI.n IlEKSIlEY NELSOX ritllAX 

DOXAI.U NOIILF. KoliEltT V()rX(i 

\,lris<,i—Mii. Fkaxk Staxton 

.l/o//r;— "Volclis .'t IK.tclls" 
<',,lnrs^\U'i] and black 
IJiiU of .l/('('^/;(/,— I'^riday 



Page Ninely-Tliree 




McDowell Music Club 



SENIOKS 



Kith Bkkkley 

ClIAIU.KS IJltKISII 
SlIHT.r.V IJCKCKIt 

Bkuxice 1?i:yku 
■Tames Funkhouser 
kosai.ie hohler 

^'EI,MA IIol.LOWAY 
TlIEI.MA .lolIXSTOX 



EI! 



l.OIISE KUAMEK 
El.IZAI-.ETH .M('< 

Eva ]\ln.i.Ei! 

I'UISl'II.I.A .M 

CHAHi.dTTE Nnoni 

HEiniAX ()LT 
IIeLEX (^)rAKTEI, 
El,I/>AI!ETH Sti-ai! 



Helex ('la(;ett 
Esther Cohen 
Rose Cohen 
Elsie Mae Cox(;er 
Alice Edwards 
ilARY Gray 
Ethel Ouoth 

Dorothy Arras 
Doris Ball 
Dolores Cox 
Paul Eickmeyer 
Fred Fuxkhoiser 
Dorothy HARrEU 
.Tajies ITowsare 

FitAXCES .TOXES 



ilARS XaEE 

William Payxe 
Katherixe Plt'mmi 
"NA^VLDo Peed 
IMariox Pothaar 
Eva Thal 
Kathryx A^'olf 



SOPIIO.MOKES 

IklTI 



Ke:\ii'er 

lilTH KlSER 
ALKERTA M eh LRER'I 

Carletox Shaxk 
Jexxie Simox 
Mildred Blorp 
AA'iLLARi) Smith 
Tior.ERT Yorxc 



Lola A'i^ererome 

. l(/(/.so/' — Miss Carrie A. Breexi 

Colors — Lavendei' and white 

/>«// of ]l('rtiit(/—Vv\i\i\\ 



Page ISinely-Fivt 



Clionian Society 



SEXious 



Ella Beei.eu 
Catherine (\m!olam> 
Elizabeth Coomi.eu 
Margaret Davis 
Pauline Dillswoktii 
KuTH Ford 
RosALYN Frank 



JUNIORS 



Elsie Mae Buetz 

Mary INIargaret De Hay^ 

MABEIi ENDERS 

Roberta Flory 
Ruth F'ogle 
Edith Funk 



Mildred Kelbi.e 
Nathalie Lauson 
Frances Richardson 
Ruth I!ost 
Eva Sauer 
Dorothy Shanor 
Verna Stewart 



Amber Granger 
Edith Gurst 
Theresa Hurst 
Virginia Kerr 
Margaret .MAiTiiEWi 

EULALIE (^UAIL 



Catherine Agne 
Dorothy Allen 
Donna Anderson 
Sarah Fear 
Mary Gray 



SOPHO:\[ORES 

Edna Housman 
Thelma Kent 
Irjia Miller 
Helen Ooley 
Frances Robertson 



Catherine Holloway Elizabeth Yox 

Adcisor — ^Irs. Dickson 

jl/offo— "Toi-etlier let us beat this ample tield" 

C'o/o/-6— Blaek and silver 

Day of Meetiny—Vridaj 



Page Ninety-Seven 



Ellen H. Richards Society 



SKMOIJS 



I'keda Htxi»i:.\tha 

KVA CfKLIO 

Sauaii Daviiison 
liiTii DrKXioi.i, 

•TlNIO DlI.TS 
IIlOMUIOTTA AllI.X 

Faith Hiukows 

(}l,i:XXA ("UAl'.MAX 
l.TCY DaTSKAKT 
AlAliKI. EXDEUS 



T>()XA AXDKKSOX 

Sakah Da IK 

Mll.lll!i:i) IfAKTZKI, 



1>ai!i:ai;a I.kuit 
Dorothy .AIcClauy 
Hki.kx ^IcFaulaxi) 
]\Iai!Tha Siiaxk 

Kl.IZAr.KTII ^Vo(iOMAX 



•TrXIOKS 



(iltACIO HaI'XKU 
]\[AYr.KI.I.K SlIIOAK 

Dorothy Storms 
^Iauy Storms 
IIei.kx Trace 
Vera ^^'ei.ty 

soriioMoifKS 

IxinnioiRi) LriKiREx 
Emma ^IcChesxey 

llEEEX >^'A(:XEU 



.IJc/wr— Miss V. M. (Jrecjory 
il/o^/o— "q^lierc is no iiohle life without ii 
ro/o/-.s-— (lold and white 
l>(iij of .l/fY'f//(r/-— Wednesday 



Page NinelyMi 



Steele Y. W. C. A. Club 



SENIORS 



Bernice Buyer 
Pauline Chaney 
Violet Evans 
Elizabeth Folgek 
Esther Guy 
Kathryn Hall 
Rosalie Hohler 
LiNwooi) Hoover 
Mary Knox 
Louise Kramer 
Alma Lixxweii.er 
Jane ilcCANx 
Mary :Musselman 



Ethel Guy 
Kathryn Hahn 
Reah Miller 
Virginia Moore 
Leii>a Nester 
Harriet Rosnagle 
^Marion Rothaar 
Ruth Schaeffer 



Flossie Back 
Mildred Br.\tten 
Rachei, Brown 
Jean Colville 
Angela H eil(; ef( )RI > 
Sarah Hines 
Kathryn Hollo way 
Loi'isE Johnson 
Lois Kelly 
Vir(;inia Klinc; 



Helen (^uartel 
Dorothy Roehm 
Alice Skelia- 
Verna Stewart 
Catherine Surer 
Dorothy Switzer 
Edna Von Bercje 
Elsie Voris 
Gwendolyn Weeks 
Evelyn Withoft 
Faith Wolf 
Garkoll ^^'ooI)s 
Gatherixe Woodward 



JUNIORS 



P:thel Urban 
Kathryn Wajipler 
TsABELLE West 
Kathryn Wolf 
Florence Worrell 
Mabel AA'right 
Ruth Yoitngs 
Kathryn Zile 

SOPHOMORES 

Electa Lehman 

AliBERTA MeHLBERTH 

^[artha :\roTE 

Rt'th Musselman 
Gharlotte Owen 
Leona Schaeffer 
Ernestine Schmidt 
;\[arie Schmidt 
Alice Spicer 
Elizabeth Vox 



^fiiUAM Zumbrum 



Mrs. John Finley 



Advisors — ^Iiss Grace McNirr, iliss Gaurie Bri 

Colors — Red and black 

Motto — "To live pure, to speak true, to rioht wrouig, to follow the Kinj 

Dai/ of Mcctinfj — Tuesday 



Page One Hundred and One 



Geographical Society 

SEMOKS 



Kkitii (Mstis 

f'HAUI.KS EllWAKI) 
.T(»K EXSl.KV 
Kni'.EUT iMHtSK 



CUAUI.KS llll.K 

.Than Tail -Tom:; 
11 KiU'.KiiT Kaun 
I'.ASU. K. Lkevkk 



EtCKXK llAKKI.IN DrUW.MM 

.TaMKS IlKK.MAN 



Dkax rrsox 



WixsTox \a:v. 
Kai.i-h TlXSl.EY 

AVii.i.iA.M \\'a(;xi 



Dat.e Davis 



William Wallac 
Allex Wilsox 
Walter \\(n.v 



S()1'11(».M<»KI> 



lldliEUT OSLEU 



"UEUEKK'K (JLA/K -IAMES 

,\,lris(,r -Ml!. \\EU1'HXEU 

/>((// of .l/fr/(/(//— Friday 

.)/o//o— The world to coiuiuci 

ro/o/-.s— Red iu.d black 



/'nge One Hundred and Three 





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mftJ!^. 


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^tf^ «|£. 


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Hi Y Club 



SENIORS 



George Barte 
John Blocker 
Harold BifiOEU 
Lysle Butler 
Eugene ' Haerlix 
Richard Hendricks 
Lowell Holycross 
Charles Hoey 
Jean Jones 
David McConnaughey 
Robert McConnaughey 



Louis jMcLean 
Richard Mote 
Ericson Poling 
David Prugh 
Kenneth Rench 
Norman Routzohn 
Myron Seery 
John Shank 
Dean Upson 
Paul ITpson 
Robert Zehring 



JUNIORS 



Eugene Cetone 
Harold Dunham 
Walter Ferguson 
Howard Geiger 
Tischer Hoerner 
David Lange 
Philip Lebendekfi: 
William Payne 
Verl Perrine 
Louis Poock 



Paul Smiley 
Richard Schwartz 
FlOYD Stoner 
Charles Tyson 
John Vance 
Charles Wagner 
WiLLIAJI ^A'agner 
ORVIIJ.E Wright 
Donald Yoi^ng 
Hildreth Zehring 



Roger Bury 
Howard Hartman 
George Marshall 
Don Noble 



SOPIIO^iIORES 

Nelson Urban 
Richard Wagner 
William Wright 
Robert Young 



A<hm>r—V. II. ^[cKee 
Dai/ of .Ur<tin(/—ThnvH(]ax 



Page One Hundred and Five 



Otto lioKCK 
Lysm-: HrTi.KK 

(M,YI)K (ii:illUN( 



.loii.x 15 



h'iCHAUi! 1''A1"ST 
KOBEKT FUEKll 

Kor.EKT Haas 
TisciiEU Hokum 



Varsity "S" 

SENIOKS 

.Tacksox Ki:i:i-i:k 

Ol.LIK Kl.KIO 

Koi!i:i!T .M((\)N.\Ar(;iii:Y 
Daviii Pack 

•irxioKS 



UiciiAKi) Dor.KLKiT Thomas Shaukky 



V\\ I, S.MII.EY 

(Jkoikjk Staiil 
DoxAi.i) SnutiiK; 

lOlHiAU TOI.I.KY 
OUVll.l.K W'lilCIlT 



Sorno.MOKKS 
Thomas Ukmun .Toski'H 1.on(;nk(KKK 

Wii.UAM BoxsKK Hauvky .Mili.kk 

Stkphen KrcHANON l^i:«> /im.mkkmax 

KOI.LA HaI!I.O\V n.KASAXT ZlMMKU.MAX 

Adtisor KOLAXII r.KVAX 

Daij of .U('(tiii!/^Vv\^h\\ 



Page One Hundred and Seven 




Technical Research Society 



SENIOUt 



Geokge Barte 
Charles Hoey 
Paul Lapp 

WlLLL\M PrATHER 

Cleo Better 
Henry Reuther 



Earl Kuppert 
Myron Seery 
Harry Sefton 
DuRwooD Smith 
Leonard Smith 
Edward Tobias 



Kobert Haas 
Thomas King 
Byron Litz 



Harry Cosner 
William Foutz 
Ormal (}eou(;e 

Adris 



Karl Woditsch 

JUNIOKS 

Hal Schaeffer 
KoGER Strauss 
Donald Young 

HlLDRETH ZeIIUING 

SOPHOMORES 

Alfred Hill 
Robert Rex 
Stewart Wallai' 

-:Mu. E. J. Robinson 



Ddi/ of J/rffn;;/— Tlmrsday 



Page One Hundred and Nine 




Steele Service Society 



Ei.LA Hinoi.Ki: 

^llIJIUICI) Dkady 
PaT'I.I.NE DlT.l.SWOUTII 

-Trxi: DiLTs 
Patlixk DorcHTY 
Violet IOxaxs 
Elizaiu-i'ii Koi.ckk 
(ii,Ai)Vs Fkyak 
Mak(;ai!i;t Hai.tk.ma.n 



KOSALIK ll()lll,i;it 

^Mildred Kklhle 
Fi-oRExcE Mayeu 
.Iaxk .McCaxx 

ClIAKI.OTTI-: NlKDHA.MKK 
IlELEX (^lAUTi;!, 

I''axxii: Kosexthal 
I'aci.ixe Schkoy 

(i\VEXIi()I.YX \\'EEKS 



Elizabeth Wocomax 
JUNIOKS 



IIelex ('la(;et 

IlAUUIET ROSX. 



Kathkyx Wtn.v 
Kith Y()rx(is 



EmL\ liruKi 



A<h 



Kathkyx Zile 
SOI'HOMOKES 



liEKTUA E. Hor.oitx 



l)<n/ of Mccliiifi — MoxDAY 



Page One Hundred and Elev 




Athena Society 

SENIORS 
Marie Wooldrige 



JUNIORS 



Clara Alexander 
Helen Anderson 
Mahala Brown 
AuRELLv DeMar 
Anna Jackson 
Wahnieta Johnson 



Julia Richardson 
:Mildred Tate 
Myrtle Tyler 
Tecora Webster 
Georgia Williams 
Isabelle Williams 



SOPIIO:\IORES 



Katharine Blackburn 
Emjia Bolton 
Edna Browne 
Ethel Carr 
Lillian Cohl 
Helen DeLeon 
Ethel Embry 
Marie Freeman 



Virginia Irwin 
Asleen Isiah 
Katherine Jarman 
Marguerite Jefferson 
Henrietta Jones 
Lucille McGregor 
;Magdalene Proctor 
Virginia Thompson 



Renelche Ward 

Advisor — Miss I-ucille Dana 

Day of Mcetinfi — Friday 

Colors — Pni'ple aud gold 



Page One Hundred and Tivelv 




DuBois Literary Society 



AVlLi^OX ()l!MKS 

Joiix Fields 
Robert Oldwixi 

GOKDOX Okmes 

Hubert Elliot 
Jajies Johnson 
Jones Mosee 



SENIOUB 



JUNIORS 



Rali'ii Johnson 



Eaul Taylor 
Randolph Taylor 
Ralph YoiNt; 

SOPriO.AIORES 

Harold Roberts 
Robert Scales 
Theodore Smith 
William Smith 



Advisor — ^[u. Painter 

Motitf — "Wlieir tliere is no vision, tlie people perish 

Colors — Blue and white 

Da 11 of Mrrthifi — I'ridav 



Page One Hundred and Thirteen 



», ft 



-I f 1 1 1 1-> 

ft ....,- ..If , ( ^^ 



Steele Graphic Arts Club 



t>ENI()liS 



Jeaxette Barnes 
Sidney Clakk 
("has. Edwauds 
Lester Ellison 
Mark E. Eear 
Dorothy (Joetz 
E^vEI.L Hendricks 



Louis Ingi.efinger 
Tom Johnson 
George Koogler 
Helen Sapp 
EussEi-L Shanks 
Elizabeth Thomas 
Ethel ^'\'EIRETER 



CaKLE ^VOLF 

JUNIOUS 

MiNA Barnes Maiiy Belle Sheaf 

Harold Broavn Isabelle Stevens 

Ethel Chubb Wilbt'r Wittmer 

Irvix Curtin Margaret WITHRo^v 

David Lan(;e Howard Whyte 

Kobf;rt La ^'lELLE Florence Wenger 

Lat-uen ]Mc("lf,ary Carolyn Wentz 

:MaRS a. NaFE :\rELVIN WARMAN 

Pearl Zumbrink 

sorH():\[()KES 

Dale Davis Bessie Wieland 

Page One Hundred and Fourteen 



Members of the Glee Club 



SEXIOUS 

EsTHKU Miller 
JIaujokie Krewsteu 

J U MORS 

Estella Boll 
Helen Brown 
Ai.BERTA Carder 
Florence Carr 
Helen Clagett 
Mabel Colvin 
Catherine Common 
Elsie JIae Conger 
Alice Edavards 
Margaret Filbert 
Kathryn Hahn 
Rosin A Hyre 
Dorothy Kiefer 
Ruth Kramer 
Virginia Moore 
Leila N ester 
Vernita Nicholas 
Anna Pfeiffer 
Mildred Pi.ocher 
Katherine Plummer 
wilhelmina schwenk 
Elsie Swartz 
Emma Woodward 
Ruth Youngs 
Elizabeth Yox 
Elizabeth Sti'art, Pianist 



SOl'HOMORES 

Katiierlxe Agne 
Donna Anderson 
Doris Bali- 
T^ois Boll 
Helen Buehner 
JIary Denison 
Hazel Ehrstine 
Colette (Jets 
Miriam (Ioldberger 
Mary (tray 
Angela Hilgeford 
Kathryn Hoij-oway 
;Marjorie Holycross 
Hannah Houser 
Anna Houser 
Josephine Keck 
Virginia Kling 

JiTANITA MeNDENHALL 
ClEONA JMlLLER 

Lucille Opdyke 
Wanda Poling 
Evelyn Riley 
Elizabeth Robbins 
Harriet Ruwaldt 
Jean Schaeffer 
Ellen Seifert 
Jessie Staub 
Miriam Steffy 
Reva Sussman 
Norma Theobald 



Page One Hundred and Seventeen 




Astrophilian Club 



Paitl] 



DlIXSWOKTH 



SENIORS 



JUNIOKS 



Viola Aumstuong 
Virginia Bear 
Gertrude Bucher 
Isabelle Lakin 
Austin Lee 
Clarence Liesenhqff 



Alice Skelly 

John 1'ierce 
Ruth Kathaveg 
Oscar Silverman 
Edwin Smith 
Virginia Steenuod 
Elsie S\yartz 



llARGARET APPLE 

Coletta Geis 



SOPHOMORES 

Skidmore Johnson 
Elizabeth Robbins 

i[lRIAM GOIJ^BERGER ;^^ARCELLA ^'N'EHNER 

Adrisor — Mr. :Mumma 
Motto — Ad castra per aspera - 
Colors — Silver and blue 
Day of Mcctiuti — Tuesday 



Page One Hundred and Eighteen 




Manual Training Exhibit. 

In looking' at the above illnstratioii one would think he had been 
given a display photo of sample fuvjiitni-e gotten ont by a mamifactnver, 
but such is not the ease. These articles are the results of boys' efforts in 
the wood-working department of Steele High School this year. How 
proud the boy may be to carry home at the close of the school year the 
fruits of his labor and say, "Here, Dad, this is Avhat I made in the ilanual 
Training Department this year." And with what pride will the :Motlier 
call in her friends to see the Library Table, or hear the music from a 
Phonograph her own boy has constructed.- Truly we can say with 
, Comeuius, the great teacher of old: "Let things that have to be done 
be learned by doing them." 

F. C. S. 



Page One Hundred and Nineteen, 




Steele Calendar 



starts. MiK-li coniparison of freckles, acquired 



Sept. 7— School 
during the summer. 

Sept. 8 — No school. Hurrah for the Fair! 

Oct. 2 — Steele defeats Sandusky. Score 83-3. 

Oct. 8 — Dignified ( ? ) Seniors are again little girls — curls, braids, 
bobs, etc. 

Oct. 19 — ( )ur tirst reports are given out. The slowness with which 
a great many students leave the building at 2:10 is therefore explained. 
Why should they go home? 

Oct. 23 — ^The world's biggest circus is in town, ( Steele's stupendous 
carnival). It shows what cooperation can accomplish. 

Oct. 28 — Steele's original minstrels appear. Dean Upson charms 
the school ( girls especially) by singing "Avalon." 

Oct. 30 — A holiday and no rain I Steele defeats Springfield 55-0. 

Nov. 6 — The touted West Tech team of Cleveland is no match for 
Steele eleven. Score 63-7. 

Nov. 12 — Assembly. Charles Swain Thomas of Harvard Univer.sity 
addresses school. He inspires a desire for better English. 

Nov. 2-1: — Thanksgiving Assembly. Two clever plays presented by 
Dramatic Art classes. Rousing speech from Mr. Larry Bevan. 

Nov. 25 — Turkey. Annual clash between Steele and Stivers for 
city football championship. Stivers fights hard, but the inevitable hap- 
pens — Steele wins, 28-0. 

Nov. 29 — Steele Rah ! Big celebration. Steele shakes hands with 
her football stars. 

Dec. 2 — A real treat I Edgar A. Guest addresses the school. 

Page One Hundred and Twenly-Ttvo 



OUT OF THE 




Dec. 4 — Day of rain and weeping! Oak I'ai-k vs. Steele. Steele 
warriors fif^lit valiantly. Final score 19-0 favor of Chicago team. 

Dec. 6 — Are we downhearted? No I Steele celebrates close of a 
distinctly snccessful football season. Dance in (xyni. 

Dec. 13 — Koy Chapman Andi-ews, explorer, addresses the school. 

Dec. 17 — Merry Christmas and Hapjjy New Year I Holidays begin. 

Jan. 2 — Back at work. :Mrs. Panlson delivers a delightful address 
to assembly. Applies ^Mother ( J(K)se rhymes to life. 

Jan. 5 — ^Steele has a chance to see her basketball team in action. 
South High of Colnnd)ns comes out at small end of score. 

Jan. 10 — Senior class almost unanimously turns out at 7 ::^U a.m. 
to make up CiWcs. 

Jan. 27 — Of all sad words of tongue or jien. 
The saddest are, "exams again." 

Feb. 11 — Seniors have an opjKn-tunity to (lis])lay their dra 
talent. The cast for the Senior play chosen. 

Feb. 21 — Otterbein Glee Club gives some clever songs. 

Feb. 22 — AVasbington's birthday. No school. 

Feb. 25 — Steele girls rush madly about. ( La.st day for makii 
gym.) Steele-Stivers basketball event. Steele gives Stivers a, 
fight. Score 20-19. 

March 3 — Steele's basketball team is sent to tight for the 
hooors. ifr. Seigler demonstrates his ability as a cheeideader. 

March -t-5— Two-night run of tin- -'Junior Follies of 1921." 
production is a great success. Seniors are inclined to s]>eculate 
the financial outcome. 

March 12 — Steele and Stivers battle at Delaware for Southern Ohio 
Basketball Championship. Hooters see an exhibition of real basketball. 
Final score 15-13, the East Siders leading when the gun sounded. 

Page One Hundred and Twenty-Three 



latlC 



g up 
hard 



4ate 



The 
about 



HOW ^P j COUIO YOU! 







;\Iai-cli IS — St-liool dismissed for Spniij>- vacation. 

April 14 — Denisou Oiatorital Contest. ^lany silver-tongued orators 
heard from. Bob MoConuauiihey \\ill lie our representative at Denison. 

April 22-2o — Senior Tlav is jireseuted. Robert Knee is irresistible 
as Marmaduke in "The Irresistible .Marmaduke." Tremendous success. 
The play will be a pleasant memory for many days. 

May 25 — Auditorium Debate. .More youni; "Daniel Websters" come 
to the front. 

June <S — Senior finals to the fore. Lonii faces visible everywhere 
thounh no one is afraid. Oh mv no! 




Page One Hundred and Tu'entyt\ 




all 



ipc; 



line 1.) — Scni 
Many clever stunts. 

June 16 — Class of '21 will have jiradu; 
Hall. Never before will those walls have 
assemblage of knowledjie, wit, and beauty, 
sinking' hearts with a brave exterior. 

June IT — Ou this day, Steele will send us forth, 
best toward making us capable of facing the problems 
the Senior Class of '21 must tearfully sav "Good-bve." 



'W (ll 

.Mei 



:iu-losed su( 
Seniors wil 



(Inzzli 
ei- th( 




Page One Hundred and Ticenty-Fii 



Football Record 1920 



Oct. 2— Steele 83 

Oct. 9— Steele 129 

Oct. 16— Steele 83 

Oct. 23— Steele 56 

Oct. 29— Steele 55 

Nov. 6— Steele 63 

Nov. 13— Steele 99 

Nov. 25 — -Steele 28 

Dec. 4— Steele 6 



Sandusky 3 

Norwood (Ciiiciunatl ) 

Portsinoutli 

West (Colmiil)iisi 

Springfield 

West Teolinical (Cleveland) ... 7 

Kayen ( Youngstown ) 7 

Stivers 

Oak I'ark ( Illinois | 19 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, 1921 



Oct. 1— Piqna. 

Oct. 8— Elyria. 

Oct. 15 — -North (Columbus.) 

Oct. 22— Massillon. 

Oct. 29— Wabash ( Indiana, i 

Nov. 5 — Technical ( Indianapolis 



Nov. 12 — Mai-tin's Ferry. 

Nov. 19 — Stivers. 

Nov. 29 — LTnion Endicott, Endi- 

cott, N. Y. 
Dec. 10— Duvall, Jacksonville, 

Fla. 



Basketball Record 1920-1921 



Dec. 39 — Steele. 

Jan. 16 — Steele. 

Jan. 11 — Steele . 

Jan. 21— Steele. 

Jan. 28 — Steele . 



Feb. 3— Steele 15 

Feb. 5 — Steele 16 

Feb. 12— Steele 33 

Feb. 19— Steele 24 

Feb. 25— Steele 19 



ColuHibiLs East 11 

Colnnd)us South 16 

Zanesville 21 

Spriniifield 8 

Stivers 38 

Spriug-tield 13 

Technical (Indianapolis) 15 

Scott (Toledo) 19 

Kayen ( Youngstown ) 18 

Stivers 20 



Capt.vix '20-'21 Spokt 

Keefer Football . . 

Keefer Basketball 

Seibert Baseball . 



Capt.vix '21-'22 
. . . Dobeleit 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-Nine 







* 




^m ^ t 

0f ■iW «■ 


M ^"^ 




I 


jVkp ■Mr .u 




m 




1 




•^ '^ > -^ 



|^n|?^^^l HiIk^ ^^^^"^^ 



Football 1920 



Tliis year Steele repeated her performauee of IIH!) and again won 
the state championship. Tlie best teams from all sections of (Jhio were 
met and defeated by big s<'ores. The greatest victory came when the big 
\yest Technical team of Cleveland fell before the Steele offense by a score 
of 63-7. This victory gave Steele the riglit to claim the state champion- 
ship, for West Tech was defeated by only one team — East Tech of Cleve- 
land, 7-0. East Tech by virtue of its victory over Scott High also claimed 
tlie state Iionors, but refused to play Steele on a neutral field. 

CriY Chami'ioxsiiip 

The annual affair with Stivers this year gave Steele another big 
celebration. Tiie 28-0 win was a decisive victory over a big team which 
fought hard. 

The team this year was a well rounde<l footliall nuichine. The line 
did its pai't in every branch of the game as shown by the total scores — 602 
to 36 for the opponents. On defense tlie line was invincible, while it 
charged hard and (juickly on offense, allowing the backs to rip off long 
gains again and again. The backfield was the wonder of tlie state. Geh- 
ring and Uobeleit could always be counted upon to gain through the line, 
whUe tile end running of Klee and Keefer kept the stands wild witli enthu- 
siasm. Ollie's kicking was considered the best in the Ohio high schools, 
and the Keefer-to-Klee pass gained every time. 

All in all, the season was a gxeat success and the team truly de- 
served all the praise it got. The record of this year's team has made pos- 
sible a schedule for 1921 such as no Steele team has ever before played. 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-One 




PZinnmerman Boeck LZi 



immerman 




Brodtord 



<Smilh 




BacKfield ?ro5f>ech 



End Iroipecls 




Basketball 1920-1921 

Steele made a late start in basketball after having one of tiie most 
successful football seasons ever enjoyed by any Steele team. It was 
December 30 when the team took the floor against East High of Colum- 
bus. The 41-1) victory in this first game gave the team added spirit to face 
the remaining games in a hard scliedule. There were many close games 
which kept the followers of the team always i)n edge, but when the season 
ended there were only three games on the losing side of the ledger. To 
Stivers goes credit for all of these. The last two Stivers games were thril- 
lers and will never be forgotten by those present. Fight and spii-it wei-e 
there to the last second, struggling to bring back tlie victory. 

The team was new this year and it was not until the first of Fe1)ruary 
that the rough edges were i*ounded off and the team began to turn in its 
best brand of basketball. Keefer and Klee were the only members who 
had played last year. They were both right there at all times, fighting to 
win. Jack showed up especially well at the tournament and won a place 
on the All-State first team. In fact, Steele was well represented in the 
All-State ranking, every man either making one of the teams or winning 
honorable mention. ( Butler at center began to look like a world-l>eater 
toward the end of the season, and by his steady playing and all-around 
ability, \\on recognition. ) The t^^'o guai'ds were always there at the right 
time. Harlow's shooting was the subject of a lot of comment, while 
Seibert was a terror at teaiing in on the tip-off. Both of these men ^Aill 
be back next yeair to help make a winning team. Two other men who will 
be right after jobs next year are Buchanon and Longnecker, who arc both 
experts at the scoring end of the game. Sharkey and Hoerner are also 
candidates for positions on the team that promises to be a state champion. 

The season was one of the best in yeare and the spirit of the fellows 
excelled that of any previous team. Always working, always fighting, 
always giving the best they had to win, they formed a strong basketball 
combination. 



Page One Hundred and Thi, 



Baseball 1921 

Everythiiifi' points to a very successful diiamond schedule fin* 1921. 
Two g'anies that have heen played were won with big scores. Judging from 
these two games, everytliing seems to he working smoothly iind the team 
is expected to retain the city clianipiousliip lionors wliicli Htecle lias held 
for some years. 

Seibert, who was chosen to captain this year's diamond experts, is 
stationed behind the plate, and is showing a lot of baseball. "He will be 
glad to he with us next year," as the saying is, to make another winner in 
1922. Becker is also cutting capers behind the bat, receiving the offerings 
of Beldeu and Liesenhoff, who have been turning in low-hit games tliat 
would make many a big leaguer envious. 

The infield looks like a million dollars. Buchanon at third and Long- 
necker at short, are old hands at the game and have been performing in 
great style. Hoerner is playing a good game around the keystone sack, 
while Keefer is back on the job at firet playing his old game. 

The outfield likewise is showing up well. Faust, Stahl, and Haidow 
are covering the outer gardens in a way to discourage the best of hitters. 
Harlow's hitting has featured the game so far, and is such as to worry 
the opposing iJitchers. 

All the members have shown their willingness to work together and 
this teamwork, coupled with an unusual number of experienced players, 
points to another city championship. 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE '21 
April 2<) — Fairview. May 20 — Stivers. 

May 1— Bradford. May 27— Troy. 

May 6— Stivers. May 28— Piqua. 

Mav 12 — Trov. June 3 — Urbana. 



Page One Hundred and Forty-Three 




SOPHOMORE cm' BASKET BALL 




Lions 

The Lions passed through a very successful season. After losing 
their first two games, they won all their remaining games, thirteen in 
number. The success of the Lions Avas not due to a few individual stars, 
but to the team which was made up of jjlayers who worked with, and for, 
one another. The Lions will try to put another team on the court next 
season. The players are : 

Forwai'ds : Ruppert, Reel, and Upson. 

Center : Prugh. 

Guards: Cameron, Riddell, and Woditsch (Capt.) 



The record in games won and lost is as follows : 

Lions 18 Moraine P. 



Lions 14 Lawrenceburg Hi. 

Lions 24 North Park 

Lions 52 Tech 

Lions 15 Dayton Fords .... 

Lions 13 Dayton Fords . . . . 

Lions 20 Gavel 

Lions 39 Forum 

Lions 25 GeogTaphical . . . . 

Page One Hundred and Forty-Six 



..21 

..38 
.. 4 
..12 



Lions 31 Routzohn A. S 8 

Lions 28 Geographical 11 

Lions 34 Tech 

Lions 27 Gavel 17 

Lions 27 Moraine P 12 

Lions 26 Euclid Ave. U. B. ... 13 



Advice from the Prophets 

In the far and distant highlands, dwells the prophet O-I-NO-ALL ; 

He whose wisdom great surpasses all our friends and all our teachers. 

In a secret cave he dwelleth, far from biiildings, shops or houses, 

Yet the story of his wisdom, of his gi-eat foretelling powers, 

To the ends of earth has traveled, to tlie globe's remotest corners. 

After days of weary traveling, I at last found where his cave is, 

Saw him standing at its entrance, watching, waiting for my coming. 

"Welcome, stranger, come and rest here, and I'll tell you all the answers 

To the questions you have brought here. Ah ! you see I know your mission, 

Yes, I even know the questions which were giv'n you by your classmates. 

Best upon this broad rock's surface, and make notes of this I tell you : 

Do not try to write real poems, they'll not be appreciated. 

Try free verse, Miss Louise Kramer, for it now has a good market. 

Ah ! Bob Mc, 'twas not your necktie, but at your face the ladies chuckled 

Do not fret, my dear Miss Hohler, when they call you tall and stately, 

Edith Bryant would change places with you gladly, so she tells me. 

Not a red tie, Basil, never, no, not even to please a lady. 

For I fear it would not look well, with your bright and glowing halo. 

Never seek revenge. Gene Haerlin, though you sought facts on the navy. 

Mr. Kahu thought he was helping when he found a volume for you 

Titled, 'How to make a rowboat' ; thank him for his kindly helping. 

No, Dave Mc, the chord do-mi-sol never was nor is Ionic. 

You have made a good yell leader, Chai'les; preseiwe your vocal organs, 

For your voice would prove your fortune in an auctioneer's position. 

Herman, hire a secretary, then your labors will be lightened. 

Then you will not need to hurry or to miss an important meeting. 

Why not wear a large sunbonnet, then you'll not have freckles, Gwennie; 

For a color combination, why not make a red and black one? 

Breisch, do not affect a derby, for it's very unbecoming 

For a person of your stature and your general appearance. 

The forms for a proposal ai'e quite large in number, Norman, 

Perhaps Claxton and McGinnis could assist you in this matter. 

Yes, Miss Schroy, there is 'big money' in composing jazz-time ballads ; 

You can elevate the business by your sweet and simple lyrics. 

Yes, Miss Fryar, Elsie Voris is an able riding teacher; 

She can show you how to gallop at a rate that's fairly breathless. 

No, Miss Chaney, do not winte your letters on green linen paper 

For your friend might be insulted, since he is a college freshman. 

Keith, I fear you're too conceite<l ; those young ladies did not vamp you. 

They perhaps, were only wishing you'd go away so they could gossip. 

Page One Hundred and Forty-Eight 



Zehi'ing, never use sarcasm, even thonyli someone deserves it, 
For, he, like yon, may use it, and then perhaps yon'll snffer. 
Never contradict a woman, Mote, you really should know better, 
If you make much noisy racket when yon enter, I ddu't lilame lici-. 
Blocher, use a dictionary, it will answer all your (|nestions. 
Ranch, if you can't start your speech well, why not purchase a self-starter? 
That is all," the prophet murmured ; turned, and passed into his dwelling. 

CATHERINE Surer. '21. 



Charles Breisch is nearing a nervous breakdown. The cause is 
thought to be the strain of trying to stud\- and to talk to Dorothy Cham- 
berlain at the same time. 

Judging from the way he watches the airplanes, Keith ( *ustis intends 
to be a sky pilot some day. 

First Boy: "Well, I suppose yon are ready for the sheep skin?" 
Second Boy : "No, it seems as if I am going to be the goat." 

Dorothy Chamberlain (reading absent-mindedly in Latin) : "O, 
Sibyl ! don't write your prophesies on leaves ; speak them through your 
ears." 

Little bits of people. 

Little bits of brains. 
Make' Steele High a misery 

And give the teacher pains. 

Margaret Haas : "Herman Olt says he means to be an aviator." 
Edith Saner : "Well, he always was flighty." 

Miss Stivers (disgusted) : "Did you never go before an audience?" 
Basil Leever : "No"m ; the audience always went first." 

Mrs. Beck : "What made the tower of Pisa lean?" 

Dorothy Gattman : "It was built during a i^riod of famine." 

Mrs. Estabrook : "Nobody ever heai'd of a sentence without a predi- 
cate." 

Robea*t Young : "I have." 
Mrs. E. : "What is it?" 
R. Y. : "Thirty days." 

Mr. Mumma : (to agriculture class) : "Take out your Ixioks and turn 
to insects." 

Page One Hundred and Forty-Nine 



Mr. Painter (to tardv student) : ''Now. I don't expect to see rou 
here again." 

Joel Allen: "Not see me here again. Why. you haven't re-signed 
your job, have you?" 

Hennan Olt : "I'm soliciting ads for our High ^^cliool paper; can 
you help me out"?'' 

Non-progressive Merchant: "Henry, help this boy out. but don't be 
too rough with him. 

Russell Brundige: "If a burglar broke into the cellar, would the 
coal-shute?'' 

Paul Bunger : "Xo. but the kindling wood." 

Mr. Mumma : "Have you proved this theorem'?" 

Paul Lapp : "Well, sir, proved is rather a strong word, liut I will say 
I have rendered it highly probable." 

Frank McCann (examining fossil in Physics). "Two thousand years 
old'? You can't fool mel Why it's only 1!»21 now ! 

"How is your cold, Betty'?" 

Betty ilacConnaughey : "Very obstinate." 

"And how is your brother'?'' 

Betty M. : "About the same." 

Louise Kramer : "They say Orplieus of old could make a stone wall 
move with his music.'' 

James Funklu)user : "That's nothing. Why. I made the two families 
next to us move." 

Mr. Foerste (in Physics class |: "Kolyert Corwin, recite the first 
paragraph." 

Robei't C. : "Well-er-a-you-see — " 
The Bell— Zing— g-g-g! 
Robert C. : "Savetl again.'' 

Jim Herman to Norman Routzohn (after searching the halls for sev- 
eral periods) : "I've been on a wild-goose chase all day, but I've finally 
found you." 

Miss Fife: "Aren't you ashamed to come in so late every morning?" 
Cable Wolf : "Yes'm, but I'd rather be ashamed than get up early." 

Catherine Sidier (joyously) : "Oh ! I've found one! I've found one!" 
Pauline Schroy : "What, a string of pearls?" 
Catherine : "No, a main issue !" 

Mr. Foerste : "Will someone please give a talk on artesian wells?" 
Dorothy Roehm : "What did you say his name was?" , 

Page One Hundred and Fijty 



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.^ 




The Shearing of the Locks 

(With apolop:ies to Pope) 
What frightful happenings from little deeds are sprung! 
How fair the locks whose fatal hour has rung ! 
Oh, for a tongue of leaping, burning flame 
To sing the deathless pangs and crimson shame ! 
Oh, ^Mothers who iu' trembling silcnre wait 
The dread blow, th' metallic snips of Fate! 
The mid-day sun in golden sjdendor shone 
But paused, ashamed, where radiant Rutli, alone 
Before the whiteness of her di'essing table stands, 
With consummate skill em])loying both her hands. 
Now with a rosy finger tip she. trains 
A jet black lock to curl o'er snowy plains 
Of lofty brow ; now a soft puff of Avhite 
She giiides across her face ; it is alight with snowy beauty 

more than mortal ; now 
A fluff of pink moves quickly o'er her cheeks ; 
They bear a bloom which maiden coyniess sj^eaks. 
A line of red, — her lips like roses glow 
Or like her face when vagraint breezes blow, 
The curling tresses fi-om a dainty ear, 
Reveal a pink-like sliell to gazers far and near. 
One touch more; the jetty brows are bent 
In arch of high disdain ; yet not content. 
With pouting lips there stands the maiden fair. 
And in. despair surveys her flowing hair. 
Black as the great Jove's frown it ripples down 
And wraps her slender form in silken gown. 
Therein her sorrow lies ; alas that curling hair 
Is far too long to be judged truly fair. 
As stands the lovely maiden grieving so, 
She sees come tripping past her in the sti'eet below 
A piquant, saucy lassie, on whose head 
The golden locks are bobbed. In sudden dread 
Lest she be thought less lovely than that lass, 
Ruth seizes scissors, and with snips the.y pass 
Through the dai*k locks; with a great shout 
Of triumph she sees tresses all about 
Fall on the floor; Avliile now her haughty head 
With bobbed hair, its curls of ebon shed 
Is borne with coquetry aloft. The maiden fair 
Proceeds to school to show her sheared hair. 
The envy of her mates; while at her home 
Her matron-mother mourns with tearful moan 
The locks which grew for sixteen years and more. 
And now lie wasted 'pon the disgraceful floor. 
She gathers lovingly into an old shoe box 
Each one of those long, black and curling locks. P. S. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-Three 



^eever : "The dentist tells me I have a large cavity that needs 
filling." 

Everett La;\'mou : "Did he recomiaend any special course of study?'' 

Miss Charch (to John Kramer) : "Well, John, are you finished with 
your lab test?" 

John : "Yes, I answered every question." 
Miss Charch : "How did you answer them?" 
John : "I answered that I didn't knoAv." 

Pauline ('urtner (at a baseball game) : "My, that team lias a won- 
derful pitcher. He hits our boys' bats, no matter where they hold them." 

:Miss Breene : "What are the silent watches of the night?" 
Harold Dunham : "They are the ones whose owners forget to wind 
them." 

Mr. Pumphrey: "Who was Hannibal. Jack?" 

Jack Semmelman : "Oh, yes ; Hannah Bell is a little girl, who lives 
next door." 

Lost: A debate in Room 20, Steele IHgh School. "A" reward given. 
Found: A sense of humor in Jim Funkhouser. 

Mr. Mumma: "Now, who can tell me the insect that lives on the 
least food?" 

W. Glazer : "The moth ; it eats holes." 

Frances Lehman : "Where do you get your jokes?" 
Mary Musselman : "Out of the air, so to speak. Why do you ask?" 
Frances L: "I would suggest that you go where there is some fresh 
air." 

jVIiss Hunter: "What does 'studious cloisters pale' mean?" 
Gene Haerlin : "It's some kind of a bucket." 

Lysle Butler: "What is that charming thing Funkhouser is play- 
ing?" ' 

Chas. Breisch : "A 'cello, you lioob." 

Paul Bunger: "I slapped Charles Smith ou the face yesterday. 
You should have seen him run." 
Betty Coomler: "Oh, did he?" 
Bunger : "Yes, but he couldn't catch me." 

MLss Brown : "AVho wrote the story you are reading?" 
Priscilla Miller : "A man named 'Finis.' I've read about a dozen of 
his works." 

Miss Hall: "Have you read Nicholas Nickleby?'' 
Bright Junior : "No, I don't care for Russian novels." 

Page One Hundred and Fijty-Four 



The ABC's of 1921 

A is tlu' Annual, to Seniors so dear. 

B is the lM)bbed hair, so common this year. 

C the (Commencement to which we aspire, 

D tlie desire hat onr jiTades niijilit he liijiher. 

E the Exams which we all mnst endnre, 

F tlie Farewell whicli the Juniors procure. 

G the desire that our grades might he higher. 

H is our humor which our teachers all know. 

I the ideals which we value as gold, 

J is our joy when assemblies we hold. 

K is the knowledge we'll have when we're thru. 

L is the Lab test that makes us all blue. 

M is for IMarmaduke, irresistibly gay. 

N is the name we have won in our day. 

O is for Oak Park, our deadliest foe, 

P is our Principal, (he makes everything go.) 

Q is the quai'tet, they're a .iolly good four. 

R is the report day when we wish we knew more. 

S is for Steele, our dear Alma Mater. 

T is the trouble her scholars all make her. 

U is the union, the Seniors all feel. 

V is the value of our time spent at Steele. 
W is our work which we know all about. 

X stands for unknown so we'll just leave it out. 

Y is our youth when we're all at our best. 
Z the last of all, stands for o\ir zest. 

Ma.iorik McCluer. 



Pauline Chaney: "IIerma.n, you just bumped tliat teacher iu your 
mad rush." 

Herman Olt: "Can't heip it ( rushing up back stairs). Haven't got 
time to go back and try it again." 

Russell Brundige and Robert. Coi-win i-unning in opposite directions 
struck each other. 

Russell B. : "How you make my head ring." 
Robert C. : "That's a sign it's hollow." 
Russell B. : "Didn't yours ring?" 
Robert C. : "No." 
Russell B : "That's a sign it's cracked." 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-Five 



An Appreciation 



The lueiubers of the Staff wish tu express their 
appreciation for the assistance that they have re- 
ceived in the compilation of this volume. 

The artistic success of this, as well as of all 
previous Annuals, is clue to the untiring efforts of 
Miss Annie Campbell. She has at all times, with 
great kindness and consideration, given advice and 
help in the choice of illustration and other art fea- 
tures of the book. We wish .to express our thanks 
here to two of her pupils, Herschell P^llison, and 
Thomas Johnston, whose art contributious enJiance 
the interest and beauty of tliese pages. 

We are especially indebted to Miss Helen K. 
Burns, and Miss Mary Alice Hunter, whose con- 
tinued interest and valued suggestions were neces- 
sary for the success of composition, and arrange- 
ment. 

We thank Miss Frances Hunter, who has been of 
assistance to the Staff, in vai*ious features of the 
work. 

The Staff is grateful to Mr. Painter for his kindly 
advice which was often given during the publica- 
tion of this book, and to all other members of the 
Faculty for their support in our undertaking. 

The members of the Staff thank the student body 
for the many contributions to these pages, and hope 
that this volume may always sei-ve as a fittiug re- 
membrance of classmates and activities of the year. 



Page One Hundred and Fifty-Seven 




Afterword 
' The sun shone, the bees 
swept past me singing; 
and I too sang, shouted, 
World, World, I am coming. 



Autographs 



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HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

MAR 99